Xpub Blockchain CryptoCoins Info Club

Where can I find where the xPub is generated in Bitcoinlib?

I'm currently browsing through this high level wallet library to start programming some Bitcoin applications:
https://github.com/1200wd/bitcoinlib https://bitcoinlib.readthedocs.io/en/latest/
I'm trying to get a String value of the xPub that is used to generate new addresses for each wallet.
Can someone help me find it?
submitted by BlockchainBears to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

HowTo: Create and Spend a Electrum Segwit 3of3 Multisig wallet with Trezors

I wrote a simlar post in Bitcoin about creating a MS wallet without a Trezor, this guide will focus on creating a 3of3 MS wallet with three Trezor's. Hopefully it should be obvious how to extend this to N-of-M for any value of N or M. You can also use this as a blueprint to do MS with non-HW Electrum wallets like Android.
It should be noted that this is the most general case method for setting this up. This allows to replace non-HW Electrum wallets into this procedure where HW-wallets are referenced. For the far simpler method, just pick Cosign with hardware device instead of Cosign with key as I outline here. If you choose Cosign with HW you can do the entire process in one wallet file in one session.
The main advantage of multisig is that it reduces the risk of one compromised seed exposing all your funds. Although this is exceedingly complicated, the added layer of complications make it all the more difficult to compromise your funds. Most of the complexity is on the initial wallet setup. Sending is only a bit more complicated, and Receiving is the same as it would be for any electrum wallet.
We will be creating three wallets here, and each will use a Trezor with its own seed, passphrase, and public key (Zpub). If your just wanting to play with this process you could use one Trezor with three different passphrases. Electrum will treat this like three different wallets, since... well since it is. The Zpubs will be calculated by Electrum.
For all references to wallet passphrases or encryption passwords, I highly recommend you generate six-word passphrases. Three simple ways to construct a six-word passphrase would be to either use EFF diceware long wordlist to roll for 6 words, or create a short six-word BIP39 seed and use that as a passphrase, or create a random Electrum seed and use the last 6 words. You will need to take care that all six-word passphrases are equal or less than 50 characters. Longer passphrases can produce some unexpected results. Whenever you need to create a passphrase or password from here on out, create a six-word string as described above.
Assuming your have your Trezors initialized with passphrases enabled, our first order of business will be ensuring the authenticity of Electrum. For the PC's this must be done with PGP/GPG following the procedure spelled out on the Electrum website, or the secondary docs. It is absolutely critical that you are certain your using the correct ThomasV key. As of the time of this writing, the "correct" ThomasV key was:
ThomasV PGP: 6694 D8DE 7BE8 EE56 31BE D950 2BD5 824B 7F94 70E6
Once your Electrum install is validated, here is excruciating detail on creating and spending from a 3of3 multisig wallet. This assumes you have passphrases enabled on all your Trezors and that each has a unique name. For simplicity I will simply refer to their names at "trez-1", "trez-2", and "trez-3"

Three Wallet Creation passes

Do the following first for "trez-1", then for "trez-2" and finally for "trez-3". The order is VERY important:
  1. Wallet->New, name your wallet
  2. Then insert your Trezor ("trez-1", "trez-2", or "trez-3")
  3. Choose Multisig Wallet, then 3of3
  4. Choose Use a hardware device
  5. Select device
  6. Craft (and record) a new 6 word passphrase
  7. Choose Native Segwit derivation
  8. Record Zpub
  9. Unplug your Trezor ("trez-1", "trez-2", or "trez-3")
  10. Choose Add Cosigner Key
  11. Wait at "Add Cosigner 2" dialog

Distribute Zpubs to Finish Wallet Creation

When completing the setup for each wallet below you will be prompted for a wallet encryption password. I recommend you craft a unique six-word string as described above. If Electrum asks to reconnect to your HW wallet simply say "No". You will notice that the order is the reverse of the previous portion. As before, the order is VERY important,.
  1. Swap over to your trez-3 wallet
  2. Click "Enter Cosigner Key"
  3. Enter trez-1 Zpub
  4. Click "Enter Cosigner Key"
  5. Enter trez-2 Zpub
  6. Swap over to your trez-2 wallet
  7. Click "Enter Cosigner Key"
  8. Enter trez-3 Zpub
  9. Click "Enter Cosigner Key"
  10. Enter trez-1 Zpub
  11. Swap over to your trez-1 wallet
  12. Click "Enter Cosigner Key"
  13. Enter trez-2 Zpub
  14. Click "Enter Cosigner Key"
  15. Enter trez-3 Zpub
You can now close each wallet file.
You should now have recorded:
Keep the 12 secrets secure, separate and safe.

Receive funds into your 3of3 MS wallet

Receive just like any other wallet. All three wallets will watch the same set of addresses

Spend funds from your 3of3 MS wallet

  1. Create a TXN as you normally would on your first device
  2. In the TXN dialog hit "Preview" instead of Send
  3. In the Preview screen hit "Sign", then "Export"
  4. Copy the TXN over to your second device
  5. On your second device click Tools->Load Transaction
  6. Enter your partially signed TXN
  7. Verify the Status reads "Partially signed (1/3)"
  8. In the Preview screen hit "Sign", then "Export"
  9. Copy the TXN over to your third device
  10. On your third device click Tools->Load Transaction
  11. Enter your partially signed TXN
  12. Verify the Status reads "Partially signed (2/3)"
  13. In the Preview screen hit "Sign", then "Broadcast"

Conclusion

Certainly more complicated than a non MS wallet, but a lot more secure. Also be aware that the Segwit MS TXNs are about 40% larger than the native Segwit TXNs, so this does generate some additional cost in TXN fees.
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

KeepKey Wallets from Windows system

I want to add my xPub Key from my keepKey Hardware wallet to Cointracker, but when i click the windows link to explain how just takes me to Keepkey support site. Is there a link to the recommended way to obtain this info for cointracker?
Update: I found the documentation covering how to obtain the xPub, but now I having an issue importing to create the wallet on cointracker. I have KeepKey Firmware 6.4.0 I used the KeepKey XPub Exporter site: https://kkxpubexporter-mv2ds3ul8.now.sh/ to extract my xPub address. I’m prompted for my passphrase info to unlock the xPub info. Now i copied the Bitcoin XPub, go back to Cointracker to add a wallet Wallet Type: KeepKey CryptoCurrency: Bitcoin XPub Key: I past the address fro the exporter site. I click add wallet and get “Failed to add wallet. Please check the values below.” Any ideas of what I’m doing wrong?
I have also tried the generic xPub import menu choice as well with the same error.
submitted by admoseley to Cointracker [link] [comments]

TKEYSPACE — blockchain in your mobile

TKEYSPACE — blockchain in your mobile

https://preview.redd.it/w8o3bcvjrtx41.png?width=1400&format=png&auto=webp&s=840ac3872156215b30e708920edbef4583190654
Someone says that the blockchain in the phone is marketing. This is possible for most applications, but not for Tkeycoin. Today we will talk about how the blockchain works in the TkeySpace app.
Who else is not in the topic, TkeySpace is a financial application for decentralized and efficient management of various cryptocurrencies, based on a distributed architecture without using a client-server.
In simple words, it is a blockchain in the user’s mobile device that excludes hacking and hacker attacks, and all data is encrypted using modern cryptographic methods.
https://preview.redd.it/8uku6thlrtx41.png?width=1280&format=png&auto=webp&s=e1a610244da53100a5bc6b821ee5c799c6493ac4

Blockchain

Let’s start with the most important thing — the blockchain works on the principles of P2P networks, when there is no central server and each device is both a server and a client, such an organization allows you to maintain the network performance with any number and any combination of available nodes.
For example, there are 12 machines in the network, and anyone can contact anyone. As a client (resource consumer), each of these machines can send requests for the provision of some resources to other machines within this network and receive them. As a server, each machine must process requests from other machines in the network, send what was requested, and perform some auxiliary and administrative functions.
With traditional client-server systems, we can get a completely disabled social network, messenger, or another service, given that we rely on a centralized infrastructure — we have a very specific number of points of failure. If the main data center is damaged due to an earthquake or any other event, access to information will be slowed down or completely disabled.
With a P2P solution, the failure of one network member does not affect the network operation in any way. P2P networks can easily switch to offline mode when the channel is broken — in which it will exist completely independently and without any interaction.
Instead of storing information in a single central point, as traditional recording methods do, multiple copies of the same data are stored in different locations and on different devices on the network, such as computers or mobile devices.

https://i.redd.it/2c4sv7rnrtx41.gif
This means that even if one storage point is damaged or lost, multiple copies remain secure in other locations. Similarly, if one part of the information is changed without the consent of the rightful owners, there are many other copies where the information is correct, which makes the false record invalid.
The information recorded in the blockchain can take any form, whether it is a transfer of money, ownership, transaction, someone’s identity, an agreement between two parties, or even how much electricity a light bulb used.
However, this requires confirmation from multiple devices, such as nodes in the network. Once an agreement, otherwise known as consensus, is reached between these devices to store something on the blockchain — it can’t be challenged, deleted, or changed.
The technology also allows you to perform a truly huge amount of computing in a relatively short time, which even on supercomputers would require, depending on the complexity of the task, many years or even centuries of work. This performance is achieved because a certain global task is divided into a large number of blocks, which are simultaneously performed by hundreds of thousands of devices participating in the project.

P2P messaging and syncing in TkeySpace

TkeySpace is a node of the TKEY network and other supported networks. when you launch the app, your mobile node connects to an extensive network of supported blockchains, syncs with full nodes to validate transactions and incoming information between nodes, so the nodes organize a graph of connections between them.
You can always check the node information in the TkeySpace app in the ⚙ Settings Contact and peer info App Status;

https://preview.redd.it/co1k25kqrtx41.png?width=619&format=png&auto=webp&s=e443a436b11d797b475b00a467cd9609cac66b83
TkeySpace creates initiating connections to servers registered in the blockchain Protocol as the main ones, from these servers it gets the addresses of nodes to which it can join, in turn, the nodes to which the connection occurred share information about other nodes.

https://i.redd.it/m21pw88srtx41.gif
TkeySpace sends network messages to nodes from supported blockchains in the app to get up-to-date data from the network.
The Protocol uses data structures for communication between nodes, such as block propagation over the network, so before network messages are read, nodes check the “magic number”, check the first bytes, and determine the type of data structure. In the blockchain, the “magic number” is the network ID used to filter messages and block traffic from other p2p networks.
Magic numbers are used in computer science, both for files and protocols. They identify the type of file/data structure. A program that receives such a file/data structure can check the magic number and immediately find out the intended type of this file/data structure.
The first message that your node sends is called a Version Message. In response, the node waits for a Verack message to establish a connection between other peers. The exchange of such messages is called a “handshake”.

https://preview.redd.it/b6gh0hitrtx41.png?width=785&format=png&auto=webp&s=0101eaec6469fb53818486fa13da110f6a4a851d
After the “handshake” is set, TkeySpace will start connecting to other nodes in the network to determine the last block at the end of the required blockchain. At this point — nodes request information about blocks they know using GetBlock messages — in response, your node receives an inv (Inventory Message) from another node with the information that it has the information that was requested by the TkeySpace node.
In response to the received message, inv — TkeySpace sends a GetData message containing a list of blocks starting immediately after the last known hash.

https://preview.redd.it/lare5lsurtx41.png?width=768&format=png&auto=webp&s=da8d27110f406f715292b439051ca221fab47f77

Loading and storing blocks

After exchanging messages, the block information is loaded and transactions are uploaded to your node. To avoid storing tons of information and optimize hard disk space and data processing speed, we use RDBMS — PostgreSQL in full nodes (local computer wallet).
In the TkeySpace mobile app, we use SQLite, and validation takes place by uploading block headers through the Merkle Tree, using the bloom filter — this allows you to optimize the storage of your mobile device as much as possible.
The block header includes its hash, the hash of the previous block, transaction hashes, and additional service information.
Block headers in the Tkeycoin network=84 bytes due to the extension of parameters to support nChains, which will soon be launched in “combat” mode. The titles of the Bitcoin block, Dash, Litecoin=80 bytes.

https://preview.redd.it/uvv3qz7wrtx41.png?width=1230&format=png&auto=webp&s=5cf0cd8b6d099268f3d941aac322af05e781193c
And so, let’s continue — application nodes receive information from the blockchain by uploading block headers, all data is synchronized using the Merkle Tree, or rather your node receives and validates information from the Merkle root.
The hash tree was developed in 1979 by Ralph Merkle and named in his honor. The structure of the system has received this name also because it resembles a tree.
The Merkle tree is a complete binary tree with leaf vertexes containing hashes from data blocks, and inner vertexes containing hashes from adding values in child vertexes. The root node of the tree contains a hash from the entire data set, meaning the hash tree is a unidirectional hash function. The Merkle tree is used for the efficient storage of transactions in the cryptocurrency blockchain. It allows you to get a “fingerprint” of all transactions in the block, as well as effectively verify transactions.

https://preview.redd.it/3hmbthpxrtx41.png?width=677&format=png&auto=webp&s=cca3d54c585747e0431c6c4de6eec7ff7e3b2f4d
Hash trees have an advantage over hash chains or hash functions. When using hash trees, it is much less expensive to prove that a certain block of data belongs to a set. Since different blocks are often independent data, such as transactions or parts of files, we are interested in being able to check only one block without recalculating the hashes for the other nodes in the tree.
https://i.redd.it/f7o3dh7zrtx41.gif
The Merkle Tree scheme allows you to check whether the hash value of a particular transaction is included in Merkle Root, without having all the other transactions in the block. So by having the transaction, block header, and Merkle Branch for that transaction requested from the full node, the digital wallet can make sure that the transaction was confirmed in a specific block.

https://i.redd.it/88sz13w0stx41.gif
The Merkle tree, which is used to prove that a transaction is included in a block, is also very well scaled. Because each new “layer” added to the tree doubles the total number of “leaves” it can represent. You don’t need a deep tree to compactly prove transaction inclusion, even among blocks with millions of transactions.

Statistical constants and nChains

To support the Tkeycoin cryptocurrency, the TkeySpace application uses additional statistical constants to prevent serialization of Merkle tree hashes, which provides an additional layer of security.
Also, for Tkeycoin, support for multi-chains (nChains) is already included in the TkeySpace app, which will allow you to use the app in the future with most of the features of the TKEY Protocol, including instant transactions.

The Bloom Filter

An additional level of privacy is provided by the bloom filter — which is a probabilistic data structure that allows you to check whether an element belongs to a set.

https://preview.redd.it/7ejkvi82stx41.png?width=374&format=png&auto=webp&s=ed75cd056949fc3a2bcf48b4d7ea78d3dc6d81f3
The bloom filter looks for whether a particular transaction is linked to Alice, not whether Alice has a specific cryptocurrency. In this way, transactions and received IDs are analyzed through a bloom filter. When “Alice wants to know about transaction X”, an ID is requested for transaction X, which is compared with the filled segments in her bloom filter. If “Yes” is received, the node can get the information and verify the transaction.

https://preview.redd.it/gjpsbss3stx41.png?width=1093&format=png&auto=webp&s=4cdcbc827849d13b7d6f0b7e7ba52e65ddc03a82

HD support

The multi-currency wallet TkeySpace is based on HD (or hierarchical determinism), a privacy-oriented method for generating and managing addresses. Each wallet address is generated from an xPub wallet (or extended public key). The app is completely anonymous — and individual address is generated for each transaction to accept a particular cryptocurrency. Even for low-level programming, using the same address is negative for the system, not to mention your privacy. We recommend that you always use a new address for transactions to ensure the necessary level of privacy and security.
The EXT_PUBLIC_KEY and EXT_SECRET_KEY values for DASH, Bitcoin, and Litecoin are completely identical. Tkeycoin uses its values, as well as other methods for storing transactions and blocks (RDBMS), and of course — nChains.

Secret key

Wallets in the blockchain have public and private keys.
https://preview.redd.it/br9kk8n5stx41.png?width=840&format=png&auto=webp&s=a36e4c619451735469a9cff57654d322467e4fba
Centralized applications usually store users’ private keys on their servers, which makes users’ funds vulnerable to hacker attacks or theft.
A private key is a special combination of characters that provides access to cryptocurrencies stored on the account. Only a person who knows the key can move and spend digital assets.
TkeySpace — stores the encrypted key only on the user’s device and in encrypted form. The encrypted key is displayed as a mnemonic phrase (backup phrase), which is very convenient for users. Unlike complex cryptographic ciphers, the phrase is easy to save or write. A backup keyword provides the maximum level of security.
A mnemonic phrase is 12 or 24 words that are generated using random number entropy. If a phrase consists of 12 words, then the number of possible combinations is 204⁸¹² or 21¹³² — the phrase will have 132 security bits. To restore the wallet, you must enter the mnemonic phrase in strict order, as it was presented after generation.

Result

Now we understand that your application TkeySpace is a node of the blockchain that communicates with other nodes using p2p messages, stores block headers and validate information using the Merkle Tree, verifies transactions, filters information using the bloom filter, and operates completely in a decentralized model. The application code contains all the necessary blockchain settings for communicating with the network, the so-called chain parameters.
TkeySpace is a new generation mobile app. A completely new level of security, easy user-friendly interfaces and all the necessary features that are required to work with cryptocurrency.
submitted by tkeycoin to Tkeycoin_Official [link] [comments]

Bull Bitcoin’s Dollar-Cost Averaging tool for Canadians: a detailed overview

Hello fellow Canadian Bitcoiners!
I'm Francis Pouliot, CEO and founder of Bull Bitcoin (previously known as Bitcoin Outlet) and Bylls.
I haven't been active on Reddit for a while but I thought I'd pop back here to let the community know about our new dollar-cost averaging feature, "Recurring Buy"
This post is a copy of my most recent medium article which you can read here if you want to see the screenshots. https://medium.com/bull-bitcoin/bull-bitcoins-dollar-cost-averaging-tool-for-canadians-the-right-time-to-buy-bitcoin-is-every-day-82a992ca22c1
Thanks in advance for any feedback and suggestions!
[Post starts here]
The Bull Bitcoin team is constantly trying to reduce the frictions ordinary people face when investing in Bitcoin and propose innovative features which ensure our users follow Bitcoin best practices and minimize their risks.
We are particularly excited and proud about our latest feature: an automated Bitcoin dollar-cost averaging tool which we dubbed “Recurring Buy”.
The Recurring Buy feature lets Bull Bitcoin users create an automated schedule that will buy Bitcoin every day using the funds in their account balance and send the Bitcoin directly to their Bitcoin wallet straight away.
We put a lot of thought in the implementation details and striking the right trade-offs for a simple and elegant solution. Our hope is that it will become a standard other Bitcoin exchanges will emulate for the benefit of their users. This standard will certainly evolve over time as we accumulate feedback and operational experience.
In this article, I cover:
The problem that we are trying to solve
Recurring Buy feature details, processes and instructions
The rationale (and tradeoffs) behind the main feature design choices
Bull Bitcoin is only available to Canadians, but non-Canadians that wish to have a look at how it works are welcome to make a Bull Bitcoin account and check out how it works here. You will be able to go through the process of create the schedule for testing purposes, but you wont be able to fund your account and actually purchase Bitcoin.
What problems does Dollar-Cost Averaging solve?
The most common concern of Bitcoin investors is, not surprisingly, “when is the right time to buy Bitcoin?”. Bitcoin is indeed a very volatile asset. A quick glance at a Bitcoin price chart shows there are without a doubt “worse times” and “better times” to invest in Bitcoin. But is that the same as the “right” time?
Gurus, analysts and journalists continuously offer their theories explaining what affects the Bitcoin price, supported by fancy trading charts and geopolitical analysis, further reinforcing the false notion that it is possible to predict the price of Bitcoin.
Newbies are constantly bombarded with mainstream media headlines of spectacular gains and devastating losses. For some, this grows into an irresistible temptation to get rich quick. Others become crippled with the fear of becoming “the sucker” on which early adopters dump their bags.
Veterans are haunted by past Bitcoin purchases which were quickly followed by a crash in the price. “I should have waited to buy the dip…”
Many Bitcoin veterans and long-term investors often shrug off the question of when is the right time to buy with the philosophy: “just hodl”. But even those holding until their death will recognize that buying more Bitcoin for the same price is a better outcome.
Given the very high daily volatility of Bitcoin, a hodler can find himself in many years having significantly less wealth just because he once bought Bitcoin on a Monday instead of a Wednesday. His options are either to leave it up to chance or make an attempt to “time the market” and “buy the dip”, which can turn into a stressful trading obsession, irrational decisions (which have a negative impact on budget, income and expenses) and severe psychological trauma. In addition, trying to “buy the dip” is often synonymous to keeping large amounts of fiat on an exchange to be ready for “when the time comes”.
There must be a better way.
Bitcoin investors should be rewarded for having understood Bitcoin’s long-term value proposition early on, for having taken the risk to invest accordingly and for having followed best practices. Not for being lucky.
Overview of features and rules
In this section I go into every detail of the Recurring Buy feature. In the following section, I focus on explaining why we chose this particular user experience.
The user first decides his target investment amount. Ideally, this is a monthly budget or yearly budget he allocates to investing in Bitcoin based on his projected income and expenses.
The user then chooses either the duration of the Recurring Buy schedule or the daily purchase amount. The longer the better.
The frequency is each day and cannot be modified.
The user must submit a Bitcoin address before activating a Recurring Buy schedule. By default, every transaction will be sent to that Bitcoin address. It’s the fallback address in case they don’t provide multiple addresses later.
Once the user has filled the form with target amount, the duration and the Bitcoin address, he can activate the Recurring Buy Schedule.
The user is not required to already have funds in his account balance to activate the schedule.
We will randomly select a time of day at which his transaction will be processed (every hour, so 24 possible times). If the user insists on another time of day, he can cancel his Recurring Buy schedule and try again.


The Recurring Buy feature as displayed on bullbitcoin.com/recurring-buys
The schedule is then displayed to the user, showing the time and date at which transactions that will take place in the future. The user will be able to see how long his current balance will last.
He can follow the progress of the dollar-cost averaging schedule, monitor in real time his average acquisition cost, and audit each transaction individually.
At this point, the user can and should change the Bitcoin address of his next transactions to avoid address re-use. Address re-use is not forbidden, but it is highly discouraged.
After having modified the Bitcoin addresses, there is nothing left for the user to do except watch the bitcoins appear in his Bitcoin wallet every day!
The Bitcoins are sent right away at the time of purchase.
Bitcoin transactions using the Recurring Buy feature will have the lowest possible Bitcoin network transaction fee to avoid creating upwards pressure on the fee market impact other network users.


What users see after first activating a schedule
The Recurring Buy schedule will be cancelled automatically at the time of the next purchase if the balance is insufficient. He can add more funds to his balance whenever he wants.
The Recurring Buy schedule will continue until the target amount is reached or until the account balance runs out.
The user can cancel his Recurring Buy schedule whenever he wants.
If the user wants to change the amount or duration of the schedule, he can simply cancel his current schedule and create a new one.
Each schedule has a unique identifier so that users can keep track of various schedules they perform over time.
Once a schedule is completed, either fully or partially, a summary will be provided which shows the number of transactions completed, the average acquisition cost, the total amount of Bitcoin purchase and the total amount of fiat spent. Useful for accounting!


A partially completed Recurring Buy schedule cancelled after 9 days due to insufficient funds
Though process in making our design choices
Recurring Bitcoin Purchases vs. Recurring Payment/Funding
The first and most important design choice was to separate the processes of funding the account balance with fiat (the payment) from the process of buying Bitcoin (the purchase). Users do not need to make a bank transaction every time they do a Bitcoin purchase. They first fund their account manually on their own terms, and the recurring purchases are debited from their pre-funded account balance.
Another approach would have been to automatically withdraw fiat from the user’s bank account (e.g. a direct debit or subscription billing) for each transaction (like our friends at Amber) or to instruct the user to set-up recurring payments to Bull Bitcoin from their bank account (like our friends at Bittr). The downside of these strategies is that they require numerous bank transactions which increases transaction fees and the likelihood of triggering fraud and compliance flags at the user’s bank. However, this does remove the user’s need to keep larger amounts of fiat on the exchange and reduces the friction of having to make manual bank payments.
Bull Bitcoin is currently working on a separate “Recurring Funding” feature that will automatically debit fiat from the user’s bank accounts using a separate recurring schedule with a minimum frequency of once a week, with a target of once every two weeks or once a month to match the user’s income frequency. This can, and will, be used in combination from the “Recurring Buy” feature, but both can be used separately.
The ultimate experience that we wish to achieve is that users will automatically set aside, each paycheck (two weeks), a small budget to invest in Bitcoin using the “Recurring Funding” feature which is sufficient to refill their account balance for the next two weeks of daily recurring purchases.
Frequency of transactions
The second important decision was about customizing the frequency of the schedule. We decided to make it “each day” only. This is specifically to ensure users have a large enough sample size and remain consistent which are the two key components to a successful dollar-cost averaging strategy.
A higher amount of recurring transactions (larger sample size) will result in the user’s average acquisition being closer to the actual average Bitcoin price over that period of time. Weekly or monthly recurring purchases can provide the same effectiveness if they are performed over a duration of time which is 7x longer (weekly) or 30x longer (monthly).
It is our belief that the longer the duration of the schedule, the more likely the user is to cancel the recurring buy schedule in order to “buy the dip”. Dollar-cost averaging is boring, and watching sats appear in the wallet every day is a good way to reduce the temptation of breaking the consistency.
We do not force this on users: they can still cancel the schedule if they want and go all-in. We consider it more of a gentle nudge in the right direction.
Frequency of withdrawals (one purchase = one bitcoin transaction)
This is one of the most interesting design choices because it is a trade-off between scalability (costs), privacy and custody. Ultimately, we decided that trust-minimization (no custody) and privacy were the most important at the expense of long-term scalability and costs.
Realistically, Bitcoin network fees are currently low and we expect them to remain low for the near future, although they will certainly increase massively over the long-term. One of the ways we mitigated this problem was to select the smallest possible transaction fee for transactions done in the context of Recurring Buy, separate from regular transaction fees on regular Bitcoin purchases (which, at Bull Bitcoin, are very generous).
Note: users must merge their UTXOs periodically to avoid being stuck with a large amount of small UTXOs in the future when fees become more expensive. This is what makes me most uncomfortable about our solution. I hope to also solve this problem, but it is ultimately something Bitcoin wallets need to address as well. Perhaps an automated tool in Bitcoin wallets which merges UTXOs periodically when the fees are low? Food for thought.
When transaction fees and scalability becomes a problem for us, it will have become a problem for all other small payments on the Bitcoin network, and we will use whatever solution is most appropriate at that time.
It is possible that Lightning Network ends up being the scalability solution, although currently it is logistically very difficult to perform automated payouts to users using Lightning, particularly recurring payouts, which require users to create Bolt11 invoices and to convince other peers in the network to open channels and fund channels with them for inbound capacity.
These are the general trade-offs:
Send a Bitcoin transaction for every purchase (what we do) - Most expensive for the exchange - Most expensive for the user (many UTXOs) - Increases Bitcoin Network UTXOs set - Inefficient usage of block space - Most private - Zero custody risk
Keep custody of the Bitcoin until the schedule is over or when the user requests a withdrawal (what Coinbase does) - No additional costs -No blockchain bloating - Same level of privacy - High custody risk
Batch user transactions together at fixed intervals (e.g. every day) - Slightly lower transaction costs for the exchange - Same costs for the user - Slightly more efficient use of block space - Same level of UTXO set bloating - Much lower level of privacy - Slightly higher custody risk
Single address vs multiple addresses vs HD keys (xpubs)
The final decision we had to make was preventing address re-use and allowing users to provide an HD key (xpub) rather than a Bitcoin address.
Address re-use generally decreases privacy because it becomes possible for third-party blockchain snoops to figure out that multiple Bitcoin transactions are going to the same user. But we must also consider that even transactions are sent to multiple addresses, particularly if they are small amounts, it is highly likely that the user will “merge” the coins into a single transaction when spending from his wallet. It is always possible for users to prevent this using Coinjoin, in which there is a large privacy gain in not re-using addresses compared to using a single address.
It is important to note that this does not decrease privacy compared to regular Bitcoin purchases on Bull Bitcoin outside of “Recurring Buy”. Whether a user has one transaction of $1000 going to a Bitcoin address or 10x$100 going that same Bitcoin address doesn’t reveal any new information about the user other than the fact he is likely using a dollar-cost averaging mechanism. It is rather a missed opportunity to gain more privacy.
Another smaller decision was whether or not we should ask the user to provide all his addresses upfront before being able to activate the schedule, which would completely remove the possibility of address re-use. We ultimately decided that because this process can take a very long time (imagine doing Recurring Buy every day for 365 days) it is better to let the user do this at his own pace, particularly because he may eventually change his Bitcoin wallet and forget to change the addresses in the schedule.
There are also various legitimate use-cases where users have no choice but to re-use the same address . A discussion for another day!
Asking the user to provide an XPUB is a great solution to address re-use. The exchange must dynamically derive a new Bitcoin address for the user at each transaction, which is not really a technical challenge. As far as I can tell, Bittr is the only Bitcoin exchange exchange which has implemented this technique. Kudos!
It is however important that the user doesn’t reuse this XPUB for anything else, otherwise the exchange can track his entire wallet balance and transaction history.
It is worth noting that not all wallets support HD keys or have HD keys by default (e.g. Bitcoin Core). So it is imperative that we offer the option to give Bitcoin addresses. We believe there is a lot of potential to create wallet coordination mechanisms between senders and recipients which would make this process a lot more streamlined.
In the future, we will certainly allow users to submit an XPUB instead of having to manually input a different address. But for now, we wanted to reduce the complexity to a minimum.
Conclusion: personal thoughts
I have a somewhat unique perspective on Bitcoin users due to the fact that I worked at the Bitcoin Embassy for almost 4 years. During this time, I had the opportunity to discuss face-to-face with thousands of Bitcoin investors. One of my favourite anecdotes is a nocoiner showing up at our office in December 2013 with a bag full of cash attempting to buy Bitcoin, “I know how to read a chart”, furious after being turned away. Many people who went “all-in” for short-term gains (usually altcoins) would show up to the Bitcoin Embassy office months later with heart-breaking stories.
This isn’t what I signed up for. My goal is to help people opt-out of fiat and, ultimately, to destroy the fiat currency system entirely.
This instilled in me a deep-rooted concern for gambling addiction and strong aversion to “trading”. I do not believe that Bitcoin exchanges should blindly follow “what the market dictates”. More often than not, what dictates the market is bad habits users formed because of the other Bitcoin services they used in the past, what other people are used to, and what feels familiar. Running a Bitcoin company should be inseparable from educating users on the best practices, and embedding these best practices into the user experience is the best way for them to learn.
Another important anecdote which motivated me to build a dollar-cost averaging tool is a person very close to me that had made the decision to buy Bitcoin, but was so stressed out about when was the right time to buy that they ended up not buying Bitcoin for a whole 6 months after funding their Bull Bitcoin account. That person eventually gave up and ultimately invested a large amount all at once. In hindsight, it turned out to be one of the worst possible times to invest in Bitcoin during that year.
Investing in Bitcoin can, and should be, a positive and rewarding experience.
Buying Bitcoin every day is the right strategy, but it is not necessarily lead to the best outcome.
The reality is that the best time to buy Bitcoin is at when market hits rock bottom (obviously). Sometimes, the upside from buying the dip can be much bigger than the risk (e.g. when the price dropped below $200 in 2015). But these are exceptions rather than the rule. And the cost of chasing dips is very high: stress, investing time and mental energy, and the very real psychological trauma which results from making bad trading decisions. Ultimately, it’s better to do the right thing than being lucky, but it’s not always a bad idea to cheat on your dollar-cost averaging from time to time if you can live with the costs and consequences.
Yours truly,
Francis
submitted by FrancisPouliot to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

(Upvote to the top) > SOLUTION FOR ZCLASSIC Eleos Wallet: "Wallet daemon can not be run. Check if daemon does not already run"

So I noticed a lot of people recently (including myself) are experiencing the error "Wallet daemon can not be run. Check if daemon does not already run" when trying to open up their ZCL Eleos wallet, and people are unable to access their funds or cannot export their private keys as well. A solution to this is now official (thanks to JBrutWhat from the BTCP team for helping me out on this.) Note: Post is being edited as more info becomes available to me.
This solution also works for users who are on the ZClassic Swing wallet experiencing the error "A general unexpected critical error has occurred: error: Couldn't connect to server, see the console output for more detailed error information!."
Eleos Wallet Troubleshooting section
ZClassic Electrum Wallet
  1. Create a new standard wallet and restore the 2FA wallet using your "seed" codes. DO NOT password protect this wallet.
  2. Disable the 2FA feature when presented with the option.
  3. Navigate to C:/Users/YOUR-NAME/AppData/Roaming/Electrum-zcl/wallets. Open the new standard wallet file with Notepad.
  4. You will need to gather the 2 private keys and one public key. To find this easily, press “CTRL+F” and search for “xprv”. Copy the 2 “xprv” values as well as the last “xpub” value. You will need these in a later step.
  5. Create a new “Multi-signature wallet”. Select “From 3 co-signers” on the first slider. Select “Require 2 signatures” on the second slider.
  6. To add the first co-signer, click “Use public or private keys”. Enter the first xprv key in this box.
  7. Add the second co-signer via a private key also.
  8. Add the third co-signer with the public key. Complete the set-up.
  9. Your wallet funds now have the ability to be sent from the multi-signature wallet.
For Users who were already using the Electrum wallet beforehand, you can go to file > new/restore wallet > next > import zclassic private keys and input the private key you obtained from the walletaid tool, and it should import the wallet into the electrum wallet. Then from there, go to file > backup wallet and export a copy of the wallet.dat file onto an offline USB.
Reminder: Backup and delete the private keys file from your desktop pc/hard drive, move it into an offline USB for safekeeping. Do not leave it on an online device.
Donate to me if you found the guide useful! Your donations 100% voluntary but they are greatly appreciated and keep us going!
ZCL: t1fkxCWJs3f2oXznGwZuEgftJ2SCjYZ8VjZ
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LhAERgWcjbbXQbGqjhy4owALGhwfpj1aw2
ETH: 0xe723305337926e1fcb5dd0495e6648569a252c13
BCH: 1JXqLHqjYH8bew38AXwEt9dmKvsdYwLtvr
LINKS
(You can join the discord rooms where there are channels for users looking for help)
submitted by BestServerNA to ZClassic [link] [comments]

Musings on the future of XMR

My thoughts and observations on XMR:
I have been following cryptocurrencies since 2010; however I did not have the requisite computer literacy at the time to effectively understand and use them. Several years ago, I bought a small amount of Bitcoin, but did not truly pusue it. Recently, I resolved to become sufficiently computer savvy. After months of self-study, I decided to test my skills with a desktop home build, to feed my gaming addiction. A friend of mine suggested I should mine Monero while the rig was idle. I had only heard of Monero as 1 of 1000 altcoins. I was intrigued by XMR's CPU minability, something I thought no longer existed in the cryptosphere. I've been mining ever since. (My rig sports an i7-6700K CPU and dual GTX 1070's.) I started mining in December of last year. I'm a hobbyist miner, nothing more, but I can say that mining has had a psychological effect on me. I follow the story of Monero with an excitement that my Bitcoin purchase never brought me. Perhaps this is because mining is an ongoing process instead of a single accumulation event. Here is a summary of what drew me to Monero, what it has already accomplished, where I think it needs to go, and what I think some of its most special features are. As a zealous convert from Bitcoin, I can't help but think of BTC as a foil for XMR.
First and foremost, I was drawn to Monero due to it's ability to be feasibly mined on both CPUs and GPUs. I like the idea of being able to put idled pieces of technology to work; old phones and computers could be utilized to mine. ASICs are expensive, closely tied to the price of the coin they mine, and provide no other utility to my life. CPUs and GPUs are a less risky investment, because they have utility and value independent of crypto mining. When I joined the Monero revolution, hardware wallets were not available yet; this means there was also an opportunity to use truly ancient tech as an air gapped wallet, allowing me to even utilize machines that were uneconomic to mine with. I have always been a sort of scrap-oriented hacker, and I take pride in mining on computers and phones that I have assembled, upgraded, or refurbished myself. This is an experience that cannot be replicated by plugging in an ASIC; one of the biggest things that drew me to Monero was the dev team's commitment to mining on consumer technology. My faith in the project was affirmed by the recent PoW change.
The second major factor that drew me to Monero related to the (in my opinion) greater utility of the address format and mnemonic seed, as compared to Bitcoin. I've always felt that BTC's mnemonic seeds and HD wallets were sort of grafted on to the underlying protocol. As an example, not all HD wallet seeds are compatible; you need to be running a program (such as Electrum) that works with that seed. In Monero, the mnemonic seed was considered from the beginning, and integrated into the core client. We can carry our XMR seeds across platform without worry. If memory serves correctly, GUI seeds can be used in Monerujo and MyMonero. I've been told they work with Cakewallet as well. This a great convenience I think we often overlook.
I feel like my next point is somewhat related to the above point; we do not have to hassle with xpubs. Using xpubs means you need to give out a new address every transaction, or deal with the consequences of address reuse. Monero's automatic stealth address integration not only addresses some of these drawbacks, but it also offers the convenience of only having to copy a QR code once. Your XMR address never changes, so it's a lot more convenient to have something like a donation address or pre-printed QR codes, for example.
Another feature of XMR that I think sets it apart is it's tail emission; surprisingly few coins have it. Not only does a tail emission incentivizes mining indefinitely, it also replenishes the coin supply. Coins will inevitably be lost over time as people die or lose their seeds; in the long term this could result in volitility due to a lack of liquidity, which is detrimental to the whole crytpo ecosystem. I think Monero's conservative tail emission is forward thinking in that respect. Enough coins will be replaced to ensure ongoing mining as well as general liquidity.
Thus far, I haven't even mentioned the privacy aspects. Ring Signatures, Ring CT, and Stealth Addresses all work together to give Monero users a great degree of privacy. These are great features that would have drawn me to hold the coin, even if they didn't pique my interest to mine it.
There can still be improvements on this front, and in fact there have been and there will continue to be. Minimum Mixins have been increasing, improving plausible deniability. Subaddresses give Monero users the ability to utilize multiple receive addresses, gaining some of the advantages of BTC's xpubs. Bulletproofs are coming, increasing the efficiency of Monero's cryptography. Kovri is coming, not just for the official GUI wallet but hopefully also for mining pools as well.
There have been other recent innovations as well such as multi-signature transactions which allow Monero to take advantage of escrow abilities. The ecosystem around the blockchain has grown as well, notably in the realm of hardware wallets. The use of Monero will likely soar as a result of these new augmentations.
Here are some of the developments I have witnessed in my short time as a part of this community:
(1) Multi-signature Support
(2) Subaddress Generation
(3) Hardware Wallet Support
(4) Anti-ASIC PoW Change
(5) Mixin Size Increase
Here's what I am looking forward to as catalysts:
(1) Kovri integration
(2) Mobile hardware wallet support via Monerujo
(3) Monero as a Debian package integrated into Tails OS
(4) Bulletproof transaction size reduction
Continuing PoW forks to combat ASICs
(5) XMR adoption as base currency on Bisq
These factors are what galvanize my belief that Monero will only increase in utility over time. XMR has lost over half it's value since I started mining, and I can't but help to see it as an opportunity. XMR is only getting steadily better than Bitcoin; parity may be closer than we think.
There is only one major roadblock to adoption, in my mind, and I believe it is an inevitable consequence of our encrypted blockchain. Frankly, making a view-only wallet is a cumbersome pain. The private view key only lets you see incoming transactions, so you need to import the signed key images from another machine. This is a much more painstaking process than simply exporting a Bitcoin xpub. Thankfully, hardware wallets can be a solution to this problem, as a means of providing access to private keys and key images. Technical difficulties are quickly melting away, priming to release Monero's revolutionary potential. Monero is my dream coin, embodying what I feel are all the central tenants of the original cypherpunk cryptocurrency movement.
What else are you looking forward to in the future of Monero? Does anyone else share my sense of giddyness for the future?
submitted by spirtdica to Monero [link] [comments]

I tested KeepKey + Mycelium + SegWit so you don't have to.

TLDR: you can send and receive Bitcoin to and from native SegWit (Bech32) addresses using KeepKey + Mycelium, but not using KeepKey + KeepKey client (yet?).
Mycelium can import the extended public key (xpub) from your KeepKey, this allows you to get a watch-only wallet on your phone, that can spend only if you connect your KeepKey to the phone. The xpub is not the private key, the private key never leaves KeepKey, you can not spend from just the xpub, cold storage is not compromised. It's a nice combination of the accessibility of an app, and the security of a hardware wallet. My favorite feature is being able to watch the value of my Bitcoin moon plummet from the comfort of my phone. The Mycelium Android wallet finally got it's SegWit update this month, and I used about a buck in Bitcoin to test the new address format.
Importing a KeepKey xpub into Mycelium
The first thing to note is that if you already had a KeepKey account in Mycelium before Mycelium's SegWit update you'll have to remove that account from Mycelium and reimport it to enable SegWit support.
To import your KeepKey’s xpub into Mycelium you need to connect the KeepKey to your phone using a USB OTG adapter, you can get one for about 10 bucks if one did not already come with your phone. When connected, open Mycelium, go to the “accounts” tab, tap the icon of a key with a “+”, tap “advanced”, tap “KeepKey”, and enter your pin.
(If you have enabled passphrase protection on your KeepKey then at this point Mycelium will also ask you to enter the passphrase now. You can read this page for instructions on how to enable/disable passphrase protection: https://help.keepkey.com/how-to-guides/how-to-disable-a-passphrase If you want to enable it change the command from “(false)” to “(true)”. This is an advanced feature so only use this if you know what you are doing, enabling and disabling it has been very flaky in my experience, but once enabled the passphrase feature itself works without error)
Accounts
Mycelium will now scan KeepKey for accounts, if you have multiple accounts on the KeepKey and want to add all of them to Mycelium you will have to go through these steps multiple times to add them one at a time. An account with zero Bitcoin will not be detected by Mycelium.
You can give the account you are adding to Mycelium a label. Mycelium will display a KeepKey logo next to the account name in the accounts tab to indicate this is a watch-only account from a KeepKey.
What can I do with an imported account in Mycelium?
Without having your KeepKey connected you can: -View your Bitcoin balance and it’s fiat value. -View all transactions including those done through the KeepKey Client app. -Generate receiving addresses in all three formats, legacy P2PKH (starting with 1), SegWit wrapped P2SH (starting with 3), SegWit native Bech32 (starting with bc1). -Receive Bitcoin on said addresses and view the incoming transactions before during and after they are confirmed. Note that Mycelium will default to generating SegWit wrapped P2SH receiving addresses, you can change the default to SegWit Native Bech32, but you can not change the default to legacy P3PKH addresses, this is important.
How do I receive Bitcoin with Mycelium?
Choose the KeepKey account from the accounts screen, tap the “receive” button and it will display a SegWit Wrapped P2SH address by default. You can switch to a Legacy or Bech32 address from this screen, and switch the default from P2SH to Bech32, but not to Legacy. This means that by default you will always be receiving Bitcoin on a SegWit address.
How do I send Bitcoin from Mycelium?
In order to send Bitcoin from Mycelium you can tap “send”, enter a receiving address, choose an amount and a fee setting. Next you will have to connect your KeepKey to the phone with the OTG adapter, enter the pin, and enter the passphrase if your KeepKey has one. The transaction will be displayed on the KeepKey’s own display, you should verify the address, amount and fee. Confirm the transaction through the physical button on the KeepKey, twice. Your transaction will be broadcast, you can now disconnect the KeepKey.
How secure is this?
The private key never leaves the KeepKey, cold storage is never compromised. The only way to sign a transaction and send Bitcoin is by connecting the KeepKey, entering the pin to unlock it, and entering the passphrase to further unlock it if you have one enabled, and then using the physical button on the KeepKey to confirm the transaction.
What does not work?
And now finally, the reason I’m making this post, what does not work. At the time of writing the KeepKey client app for Chrome is capable of sending to SegWit P2SH and Bech32 addresses. The KeepKey Client app is however not capable of generating SegWit receiving addresses, nor can it view the balance of SegWit P2SH or SegWit Bech32 addresses. It also can not send Bitcoin that was received on these addresses.
This means that if you use Mycelium to receive Bitcoin on a SegWit address, the KeepKey Client app does not understand this transaction. The KeepKey Client app will not add the balance of this address to your total balance, if this was the only transaction in the wallet it will show a zero balance. The KeepKey Client app will not be able to send Bitcoin that was received on these addresses, you can only do that using Mycelium. This can lead to confusing situations where Mycelium and the KeepKey Client app show two different total balances for the same wallet, because Mycelium sees the real balance, and the KeepKey Client app only sees the non-SegWit addresses balance.
I fully expect a future update to the KeepKey Client Chrome app to enable full SegWit support so the above will no longer be an issue, but right now receiving Bitcoin on SegWit addresses through Mycelium means you can no longer effectively use the KeepKey Client app until it is updated.
submitted by De_Wilde_Weldoener to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Decred Journal – September 2018

Note: you can read this on GitHub (link), Medium (link) or old Reddit (link).

Development

Final version 1.3.0 of the core software was released bringing all the enhancements reported last month to the rest of the community. The groundwork for SPV (simplified payment verification) is complete, another reduction of fees is being deployed, and performance stepped up once again with a 50% reduction in startup time, 20% increased sync speed and more than 3x faster peer delivery of block headers (a key update for SPV). Decrediton's integrations of SPV and Politeia are open for testing by experienced users. Read the full release notes and get the downloads on GitHub. As always, don't forget to verify signatures.
dcrd: completed several steps towards multipeer downloads, improved introduction to the software in the main README, continued porting cleanups and refactoring from upstream btcd.
Currently in review are initial release of smart fee estimator and a change to UTXO set semantics. The latter is a large and important change that provides simpler handling, and resolves various issues with the previous approach. A lot of testing and careful review is needed so help is welcome.
Educational series for new Decred developers by @matheusd added two episodes: 02 Simnet Setup shows how to automate simnet management with tmux and 03 Miner Reward Invalidation explains block validity rules.
Finally, a pull request template with a list of checks was added to help guide the contributors to dcrd.
dcrwallet: bugfixes and RPC improvements to support desktop and mobile wallets.
Developers are welcome to comment on this idea to derive stakepool keys from the HD wallet seed. This would eliminate the need to backup and restore redeem scripts, thus greatly improving wallet UX. (missed in July issue)
Decrediton: bugfixes, refactoring to make the sync process more robust, new loading animations, design polishing.
Politeia: multiple improvements to the CLI client (security conscious users with more funds at risk might prefer CLI) and security hardening. A feature to deprecate or timeout proposals was identified as necessary for initial release and the work started. A privacy enhancement to not leak metadata of ticket holders was merged.
Android: update from @collins: "Second test release for dcrandroid is out. Major bugs have been fixed since last test. Latest code from SPV sync has been integrated. Once again, bug reports are welcome and issues can be opened on GitHub". Ask in #dev room for the APK to join testing.
A new security page was added that allows one to validate addresses and to sign/verify messages, similar to Decrediton's Security Center. Work on translations is beginning.
Overall the app is quite stable and accepting more testers. Next milestone is getting the test app on the app store.
iOS: the app started accepting testers last week. @macsleven: "the test version of Decred Wallet for iOS is available, we have a link for installing the app but the builds currently require your UDID. Contact either @macsleven or @raedah with your UDID if you would like to help test.".
Nearest goal is to make the app crash free.
Both mobile apps received new design themes.
dcrdata: v3.0 was released for mainnet! Highlights: charts, "merged debits" view, agendas page, Insight API support, side chain tracking, Go 1.11 support with module builds, numerous backend improvements. Full release notes here. This release featured 9 contributors and development lead @chappjc noted: "This collaboration with @raedahgroup on our own block explorer and web API for @decredproject has been super productive.".
Up next is supporting dynamic page widths site wide and deploying new visual blocks home page.
Trezor: proof of concept implementation for Trezor Model T firmware is in the works (previous work was for Model One).
Ticket splitting: updated to use Go modules and added simnet support, several fixes.
docs: beginner's guide overhaul, multiple fixes and cleanups.
decred.org: added 3rd party wallets, removed inactive PoW pools and removed web wallet.
@Richard-Red is building a curated list of Decred-related GitHub repositories.
Welcome to new people contributing for the first time: @klebe, @s_ben, @victorguedes, and PrimeDominus!
Dev activity stats for September: 219 active PRs, 197 commits, 28.7k added and 18.8k deleted lines spread across 6 repositories. Contributions came from 4-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: started and ended the month around 75 PH/s, hitting a low of 60.5 and a new high of 110 PH/s. BeePool is again the leader with their share varying between 23-54%, followed by F2Pool 13-30%, Coinmine 4-6% and Luxor 3-5%. As in previous months, there were multiple spikes of unidentified hashrate.
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 98 DCR (+2.4). The price varied between 95.7 and 101.9 DCR. Locked DCR amount was 3.86-3.96 million DCR, or 45.7-46.5% of the supply.
Nodes: there are 201 public listening nodes and 325 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 5% are v1.4.0(pre) dev builds (+3%), 30% on v1.3.0 (+25%), 42% on v1.2.0 (-20%), 15% on v1.1.2 (-7%), 6% on v1.1.0. More than 76% of nodes run v1.2.0 and higher and therefore support client filters. Data as of Oct 1.

ASICs

Obelisk posted two updates on their mailing list. 70% of Batch 1 units are shipped, an extensive user guide is available, Obelisk Scanner application was released that allows one to automatically update firmware. First firmware update was released and bumped SC1 hashrate by 10-20%, added new pools and fixed multiple bugs. Next update will focus on DCR1. It is worth a special mention that the firmware source code is now open! Let us hope more manufacturers will follow this example.
A few details about Whatsminer surfaced this month. The manufacturer is MicroBT, also known as Bitwei and commonly misspelled as Bitewei. Pangolinminer is a reseller, and the model name is Whatsminer D1.
Bitmain has finally entered Decred ASIC space with their Antminer DR3. Hash rate is 7.8 TH/s while pulling 1410 W, at the price of $673. These specs mean it has the best GH/W and GH/USD of currently sold miners until the Whatsminer or others come out, although its GH/USD of 11.6 already competes with Whatsminer's 10.5. Discussed on Reddit and bitcointalk, unboxing video here.

Integrations

Meet our 17th voting service provider: decredvoting.com. It is operated by @david, has 2% fee and supports ticket splitting. Reddit thread is here.
For a historical note, the first VSP to support ticket splitting was decredbrasil.com:
@matheusd started tests on testnet several months ago. I contacted him so we could integrate with the pool in June this year. We set up the machine in July and bought the first split ticket on mainnet, using the decredbrasil pool, on July 19. It was voted on July 30. After this first vote on mainnet, we opened the tests to selected users (with more technical background) on the pool. In August we opened the tests to everyone, and would call people who want to join to the #ticket_splitting channel, or to our own Slack (in Portuguese, so mostly Brazilian users). We have 28 split tickets already voted, and 16 are live. So little more than 40 split tickets total were bought on decredbrasil pool. (@girino in #pos-voting)
KuCoin exchange listed DCBTC and DCETH pairs. To celebrate their anniversary they had a 99% trading fees discount on DCR pairs for 2 weeks.
Three more wallets integrated Decred in September:
ChangeNow announced Decred addition to their Android app that allows accountless swaps between 150+ assets.
Coinbase launched informational asset pages for top 50 coins by market cap, including Decred. First the pages started showing in the Coinbase app for a small group of testers, and later the web price dashboard went live.

Adoption

The birth of a Brazilian girl was registered on the Decred blockchain using OriginalMy, a blockchain proof of authenticity services provider. Read the full story in Portuguese and in English.

Marketing

Advertising report for September is ready. Next month the graphics for all the ads will be changing.
Marketing might seem quiet right now, but a ton is actually going on behind the scenes to put the right foundation in place for the future. Discovery data are being analyzed to generate a positioning strategy, as well as a messaging hierarchy that can guide how to talk about Decred. This will all be agreed upon via consensus of the community in the work channels, and materials will be distributed.
Next, work is being done to identify the right PR partner to help with media relations, media training, and coordination at events. While all of this is coming up to speed, we believe the website needs a refresher reflecting the soon to be agreed upon messaging, plus a more intuitive architecture to make it easier to navigate. (@Dustorf)

Events

Attended:
Upcoming:
We'll begin shortly reviewing conferences and events planned for the first half of 2019. Highlights are sure to include The North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami (Jan 16-18) and Consensus in NYC (May 14-16). If you have suggestions of events or conferences Decred should attend, please share them in #event_planning. In 2019, we would like to expand our presence in Europe, Asia, and South America, and we're looking for community members to help identify and staff those events. (@Dustorf)

Media

August issue of Decred Journal was translated to Russian. Many thanks to @DZ!
Rency cryptocurrency ratings published a report on Decred and incorporated a lot of feedback from the community on Reddit.
September issue of Chinese CCID ratings was published (snapshot), Decred is still at the bottom.
Videos:
Featured articles:
Articles:

Community Discussions

Community stats:
Comm systems news: Several work channels were migrated to Matrix, #writers_room is finally bridged.
Highlights:
Twitter: why decentralized governance and funding are necessary for network survival and the power of controlling the narrative; learning about governance more broadly by watching its evolution in cryptocurrency space, importance of community consensus and communications infrastructure.
Reddit: yet another strong pitch by @solar; question about buyer protections; dcrtime internals; a proposal to sponsor hoodies in the University of Cape Town; Lightning Network support for altcoins.
Chats: skills to operate a stakepool; voting details: 2 of 3 votes can approve a block, what votes really approve are regular tx, etc; scriptless script atomic swaps using Schnorr adaptor signatures; dev dashboard, choosing work, people do best when working on what interests them most; opportunities for governments and enterprise for anchoring legal data to blockchain; terminology: DAO vs DAE; human-friendly payments, sharing xpub vs payment protocols; funding btcsuite development; Politeia vote types: approval vote, sentiment vote and a defund vote, also linking proposals and financial statements; algo trading and programming languages (yes, on #trading!); alternative implementation, C/C++/Go/Rust; HFTs, algo trading, fake volume and slippage; offline wallets, usb/write-only media/optical scanners vs auditing traffic between dcrd and dcrwallet; Proof of Activity did not inspire Decred but spurred Decred to get moving, Wikipedia page hurdles; how stakeholders could veto blocks; how many votes are needed to approve a proposal; why Decrediton uses Electron; CVE-2018-17144 and over-dependence on single Bitcoin implementation, btcsuite, fuzz testing; tracking proposal progress after voting and funding; why the wallet does not store the seed at all; power connectors, electricity, wiring and fire safety; reasonable spendings from project fund; ways to measure sync progress better than block height; using Politeia without email address; concurrency in Go, locks vs channels.
#support is not often mentioned, but it must be noted that every day on this channel people get high quality support. (@bee: To my surprise, even those poor souls running Windows 10. My greatest respect to the support team!)

Markets

In September DCR was trading in the range of USD 34-45 / BTC 0.0054-0.0063. On Sep 6, DCR revisited the bottom of USD 34 / BTC 0.0054 when BTC quickly dropped from USD 7,300 to 6,400. On Sep 14, a small price rise coincided with both the start of KuCoin trading and hashrate spike to 104 PH/s. Looking at coinmarketcap charts, the trading volume is a bit lower than in July and August.
As of Oct 4, Decred is #18 by the number of daily transactions with 3,200 tx, and #9 by the USD value of daily issuance with $230k. (source: onchainfx)
Interesting observation by @ImacallyouJawdy: while we sit at 2018 price lows the amount locked in tickets is testing 2018 high.

Relevant External

ASIC for Lyra2REv2 was spotted on the web. Vertcoin team is preparing a new PoW algorithm. This would be the 3rd fork after two previous forks to change the algorithm in 2014 and 2015.
A report titled The Positive Externalities of Bitcoin Mining discusses the benefits of PoW mining that are often overlooked by the critics of its energy use.
A Brief Study of Cryptonetwork Forks by Alex Evans of Placeholder studies the behavior of users, developers and miners after the fork, and makes the cases that it is hard for child chains to attract users and developers from their parent chains.
New research on private atomic swaps: the paper "Anonymous Atomic Swaps Using Homomorphic Hashing" attempts to break the public link between two transactions. (bitcointalk, decred)
On Sep 18 Poloniex announced delisting of 8 more assets. That day they took a 12-80% dive showing their dependence on this one exchange.
Circle introduced USDC markets on Poloniex: "USDC is a fully collateralized US dollar stablecoin using the ERC-20 standard that provides detailed financial and operational transparency, operates within the regulated framework of US money transmission laws, and is reinforced by established banking partners and auditors.".
Coinbase announced new asset listing process and is accepting submissions on their listing portal. (decred)
The New York State Office of the Attorney General posted a study of 13 exchanges that contains many insights.
A critical vulnerability was discovered and fixed in Bitcoin Core. Few days later a full disclosure was posted revealing the severity of the bug. In a bitcointalk thread btcd was called 'amateur' despite not being vulnerable, and some Core developers voiced their concerns about multiple implementations. The Bitcoin Unlimited developer who found the bug shared his perspective in a blog post. Decred's vision so far is that more full node implementations is a strength, just like for any Internet protocol.

About This Issue

This is the 6th issue of Decred Journal. It is mirrored on GitHub, Medium and Reddit. Past issues are available here.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Feedback is appreciated: please comment on Reddit, GitHub or #writers_room on Matrix or Slack.
Contributions are also welcome: some areas are adding content, pre-release review or translations to other languages.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Dustorf, jz, Haon, oregonisaac, raedah and Richard-Red.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

I tested KeepKey + Mycelium + SegWit so you don't have to.

TLDR: you can send and receive Bitcoin to and from native SegWit (Bech32) addresses using KeepKey + Mycelium, but not using KeepKey + KeepKey client (yet?).
Mycelium can import the extended public key (xpub) from your KeepKey, this allows you to get a watch-only wallet on your phone, that can spend only if you connect your KeepKey to the phone. The xpub is not the private key, the private key never leaves KeepKey, you can not spend from just the xpub, cold storage is not compromised. It's a nice combination of the accessibility of an app, and the security of a hardware wallet. My favorite feature is being able to watch the value of my Bitcoin moon plummet from the comfort of my phone. The Mycelium Android wallet finally got it's SegWit update this month, and I used about a buck in Bitcoin to test the new address format.
Importing a KeepKey xpub into Mycelium
The first thing to note is that if you already had a KeepKey account in Mycelium before Mycelium's SegWit update you'll have to remove that account from Mycelium and reimport it to enable SegWit support.
To import your KeepKey’s xpub into Mycelium you need to connect the KeepKey to your phone using a USB OTG adapter, you can get one for about 10 bucks if one did not already come with your phone. When connected, open Mycelium, go to the “accounts” tab, tap the icon of a key with a “+”, tap “advanced”, tap “KeepKey”, and enter your pin.
(If you have enabled passphrase protection on your KeepKey then at this point Mycelium will also ask you to enter the passphrase now. You can read this page for instructions on how to enable/disable passphrase protection: https://help.keepkey.com/how-to-guides/how-to-disable-a-passphrase If you want to enable it change the command from “(false)” to “(true)”. This is an advanced feature so only use this if you know what you are doing, enabling and disabling it has been very flaky in my experience, but once enabled the passphrase feature itself works without error)
Accounts
Mycelium will now scan KeepKey for accounts, if you have multiple accounts on the KeepKey and want to add all of them to Mycelium you will have to go through these steps multiple times to add them one at a time. An account with zero Bitcoin will not be detected by Mycelium.
You can give the account you are adding to Mycelium a label. Mycelium will display a KeepKey logo next to the account name in the accounts tab to indicate this is a watch-only account from a KeepKey.
What can I do with an imported account in Mycelium?
Without having your KeepKey connected you can: -View your Bitcoin balance and it’s fiat value. -View all transactions including those done through the KeepKey Client app. -Generate receiving addresses in all three formats, legacy P2PKH (starting with 1), SegWit wrapped P2SH (starting with 3), SegWit native Bech32 (starting with bc1). -Receive Bitcoin on said addresses and view the incoming transactions before during and after they are confirmed. Note that Mycelium will default to generating SegWit wrapped P2SH receiving addresses, you can change the default to SegWit Native Bech32, but you can not change the default to legacy P3PKH addresses, this is important.
How do I receive Bitcoin with Mycelium?
Choose the KeepKey account from the accounts screen, tap the “receive” button and it will display a SegWit Wrapped P2SH address by default. You can switch to a Legacy or Bech32 address from this screen, and switch the default from P2SH to Bech32, but not to Legacy. This means that by default you will always be receiving Bitcoin on a SegWit address.
How do I send Bitcoin from Mycelium?
In order to send Bitcoin from Mycelium you can tap “send”, enter a receiving address, choose an amount and a fee setting. Next you will have to connect your KeepKey to the phone with the OTG adapter, enter the pin, and enter the passphrase if your KeepKey has one. The transaction will be displayed on the KeepKey’s own display, you should verify the address, amount and fee. Confirm the transaction through the physical button on the KeepKey, twice. Your transaction will be broadcast, you can now disconnect the KeepKey.
How secure is this?
The private key never leaves the KeepKey, cold storage is never compromised. The only way to sign a transaction and send Bitcoin is by connecting the KeepKey, entering the pin to unlock it, and entering the passphrase to further unlock it if you have one enabled, and then using the physical button on the KeepKey to confirm the transaction.
What does not work?
And now finally, the reason I’m making this post, what does not work. At the time of writing the KeepKey client app for Chrome is capable of sending to SegWit P2SH and Bech32 addresses. The KeepKey Client app is however not capable of generating SegWit receiving addresses, nor can it view the balance of SegWit P2SH or SegWit Bech32 addresses. It also can not send Bitcoin that was received on these addresses.
This means that if you use Mycelium to receive Bitcoin on a SegWit address, the KeepKey Client app does not understand this transaction. The KeepKey Client app will not add the balance of this address to your total balance, if this was the only transaction in the wallet it will show a zero balance. The KeepKey Client app will not be able to send Bitcoin that was received on these addresses, you can only do that using Mycelium. This can lead to confusing situations where Mycelium and the KeepKey Client app show two different total balances for the same wallet, because Mycelium sees the real balance, and the KeepKey Client app only sees the non-SegWit addresses balance.
I fully expect a future update to the KeepKey Client Chrome app to enable full SegWit support so the above will no longer be an issue, but right now receiving Bitcoin on SegWit addresses through Mycelium means you can no longer effectively use the KeepKey Client app until it is updated.
submitted by De_Wilde_Weldoener to keepkey [link] [comments]

[RELEASE] https://Stream4Bitcoin.Cash -- Accept donations paid for with digital cash (BCH) in your StreamLabs account

Hey guys
I wanted to get this out 4/20, and it was damn near ready, but things happened that stalled my release plans. :/
But it's here! Stream 4 Bitcoin Cash -- Very much tailored to be smartphone-friendly; if you carry BCH on your mobile, it is best to use Stream4Bitcoin.Cash on your mobile for convenient "bitcoincash:" URIs. Works great with Coinomi and likely other, similar wallets! :D
Instructions are very simple for streamers and viewers alike
Right now it's in fairly early BETA testing. I haven't had much testing done since much of the time I spent on this over the last several weeks was actually writing code and fixing new/existing bugs. However all of the components do work; donations work flawlessly, and the login and registration systems are both very well-tested.
The site is very solid right now, and I feel comfortable releasing it. I do have a little bit of BCH I'm willing to provide in exchange for the secure reporting of any major or hurtful bugs discovered while using my site. Any bugs that could compromise the security of transaction submissions and/or game the transaction verification mechanism are of high interest. Although, it is very unlikely a bug of this nature will be discovered as I've planned for and built mechanisms to prevent malicious attacks ;)
Right now there are no streamers signed up (except me, but I don't stream.. I'm just there as a placeholder). I've contacted some streamers I watch and have not received any responses.. if you know somebody interested in accepting BCH donations during their live streams, please have them visit my site and follow the instructions to sign up. Setup is very easy, especially when using ElectronCash.org or CoinText.io. Of course any wallet that supports the CashAddr format can be used on my site
I know the site looks like shit lol; I'd like to say I'm open to design suggestions, but tbh I'm not terribly focused on the design as it is currently satisfactory. Right now it's on Bootstrap 4, and all of the interactive components work within modals. Right now everything works, and looks decent :cheesey_smile:
Very open to any constructive feedback (not about design, please)!
Upcoming features
submitted by maff1989 to btc [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin Christmas Release!

Groestlcoin Dec 2018 Christmas Release Update

As per usual the 3 months has been all hand-on-deck, helping to bring further adoption utilities to Groestlcoin. The markets have been red but as always that doesn't stop the show from going on with regards to the development since the last release update on 24th September. Here's a recap of what has happened so far:

Recap:

What’s New Today?

Groestlcoin on Trezor Model T

As of the latest version of the Trezor Model T firmware, Groestlcoin is now officially supported! The Trezor Model T is the next-generation cryptocurrency hardware wallet, designed to be your universal vault for all of your digital assets. Store and encrypt your coins, passwords and other digital keys with confidence. The Trezor Model T now supports over 500 cryptocurrencies.

Blockbook MainNet & TestNet Block Explorer

Blockbook is an open-source Groestlcoin blockchain explorer with complete REST and websocket APIs that can be used for writing web wallets and other apps that need more advanced blockchain queries than provided by groestlcoind RPC.
Blockbook REST API provides you with a convenient, powerful and simple way to read data from the groestlcoin network and with it, build your own services.

Features:

Blockbook is available via https://blockbook.groestlcoin.org/ Testnet: https://blockbook-test.groestlcoin.org/ Source code: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/blockbook

Edge Wallet

Groestlcoin has been added to the Edge wallet for Android and iOS. Edge wallet is secure, private and intuitive. By including support for ShapeShift, Simplex and Changelly, Edge allows you to seamlessly shift between digital currencies, anywhere with an internet connection.

Features:

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.edgesecure.app
iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/edge-bitcoin-wallet/id1344400091?mt=8
Direct Android: https://edge.app/app

CoinID Wallet

We are excited to announce that Groestlcoin has been added to CoinID! With integrated cold and hot wallet support, and a host of other unique wallet features, CoinID can easily become your go-to wallet for storing Groestlcoin. More details can be found here: https://coinid.org/s/groestlcoin-wallet-overview.pdf

Features

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.coinid.wallet.grs
iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/grs-wallet-for-coinid/id1439638550

Groestlcoin Sentinel - Windows Released

Groestlcoin Sentinel is the easiest and fastest way to track balances of your Groestlcoin addresses.
Features
You can download it using the links below.
Download the Windows Wallet (64 bit) here: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/Groestlcoin-Sentinel-Windows/releases/download/1.0/SentinelSetup_x64.msi
Download the Windows Wallet (32 bit) here: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/Groestlcoin-Sentinel-Windows/releases/download/1.0/SentinelSetup_x86.msi
Source code: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/Groestlcoin-Sentinel-Windows/

Groestlcoin BIP39 Tool 0.3.9 Update

The Groestlcoin BIP39 tool is an open-source web tool for converting BIP39 mnemonic codes to addresses and private keys. This enables the greatest security against third-party wallets potentially disappearing – You’ll still have access to your funds thanks to this tool.
What’s New
Download the Groestlcoin BIP39 tool here: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/bip39/archive/master.zip
Source code: https://github.com/groestlcoin/bip39
Or use hosted version: https://groestlcoin.org/bip39/

Electrum-GRS 3.2.3 Update

Electrum-GRS is a lightweight "thin client" Groestlcoin wallet Windows, MacOS and Linux based on a client-server protocol. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for multi-signature wallets and not requiring the download of the entire block chain.
What’s New

Electrum + Android Version 3.2.3:

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.groestlcoin.electrumgrs
Windows & OSX: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs/releases/
Linux:
sudo apt-get install python3-setuptools python3-pyqt5 python3-pip python3-dev libssl-dev sudo pip3 install groestlcoin_hash sudo pip3 install https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs/releases/download/v3.2.3/Electrum-grs-3.2.3.tar.gz electrum-grs
GitHub Source server: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrumx-grs
Github Source server installer: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrumx-grs-installer
Github Source client: https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs

Groestlcoin ivendPay Integration

ivendPay and Groestlcoin cryptocurrency have announced the start of integration.
IT company ivendPay, the developer of a universal multicurrency payment module for automatic and retail trade, intends to integrate Groestlcoin cryptocurrency — one of the oldest and the most reputable Bitcoin forks into the payment system. Groestlcoin is characterized by instant transactions with almost zero commission and is optimal for mass retail trade where micropayments are mostly used.
According to Sergey Danilov, founder and CEO of ivendPay, Groestlcoin will become the 11th cryptocurrency integrated into the payment module. The first working vending machines for the sale of coffee, snacks and souvenirs, equipped with ivendPay modules, served the visitors of the CryptoEvent RIW exhibition at VDNKh in Moscow and accepted Bitcoin, Go Byte, Dash, Bitcoin Cash, Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, Zcash, Bitcoin Gold, Dogecoin and Emercoin. ivendPay terminals are designed and patented to accept payments in electronic money, cryptocurrencies and cash when connecting the corresponding cash terminal. Payment for the purchase takes a few seconds, the choice of the payment currency occurs at the time of placing the order on the screen, the payment is made by QR-code through the cryptocurrency wallet on the smartphone.
The interest in equipping vending machines with ivendPay terminals has already been shown by the companies of Malaysia and Israel, where first test networks would be installed. ivendPay compiles a waiting list for vending networks interested in buying terminals and searches for an investor to launch industrial production. According to Sergey Danilov, the universal payment terminal ivendPay for the vending machine will cost about $500. The founder of ivendPay has welcomed the appearance of Groestlcoin among integrated cryptocurrencies, as it is another step towards the realization of the basic idea of digital money - free and cross-border access to goods and services for everybody.
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

This week in Bitcoin- 9-4-2020- Price plunge, 1400 BTC ... Xpub Bitcoin Receiving Addresses with SmartBit API Building Bitcoin Websites - YouTube Blockchain Receive Payments API v2 HD BIP32 xpub Cobrar Bitcoin tu web (COMPARTIR xPub PIERDES PRIVACIDAD;USA PAYNIMS SAMOURAI BIP47 O BTCPAY SERVER)

XPub Decoded. In the diagram above, we can see that the XPub string is decoded to raw bytes, and the BIP32 definition determines which pieces of data are used for different reasons. How i can check bitcoin xpub balance using python and electrum? I have a lot of xpubs and i want to check it. (Or any other way to check xpubs without limits?) Since version 4.0 Bitcoin Wallet supports HD Wallets and derives keys from a master node in the BIP32 format. Since version 4.18 it provides a simple export functionality [3] for the key in the format: Xpub Blockchain Bitcoin . Xpub Blockchain . Mar 27, 2018 DTN Staff. twitter. pinterest. google plus. facebook. How Do I Use The Xpub To Generate The Public Addresses ... The problem is that this xpub value works ... ledger xpub. asked Apr 5 at 18:57. Paul Razvan Berg. 229 1 1 silver badge 12 12 bronze badges. 0. votes. 1answer 278 views How to generate sub addresses belonging to one private key. We're creating a platform to buy/sell Bitcoin. We need to generate a new child address for each customer allowing them to receive Bitcoin. But all incoming Bitcoins ...

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