bitcoin core - How to retrieve unclaimed BTC for wallets ...

CryptoAustralia

WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF CRYPTOCURRENCY! Crypto Australia is a subreddit for Australians and New Zealanders to talk about anything related to crypto.
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Lost my Bitcoin Wallet Login but have my Private Key I think?

Like the title says I cant access my wallet however I made a backup of my private key a few years ago. The format does not make sense to me though. Parts of it resemble what I think the key should look like except there is + symbols, dashes and forward slashes separating strings of numbers/letters. Its also a few lines long. Appears to be more than one key? No idea what do to do. Any insight or direction would be appreciated.
submitted by CutCurious to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Lost my wallet codes. I have private and public key but no seed phrase. What now? /r/Bitcoin

Lost my wallet codes. I have private and public key but no seed phrase. What now? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What If I have the paper wallet private key, but lost the laptop? /r/Bitcoin

What If I have the paper wallet private key, but lost the laptop? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Lost my Bitcoin Wallet Login but have my Private Key I think? /r/BitcoinBeginners

Lost my Bitcoin Wallet Login but have my Private Key I think? /BitcoinBeginners submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Dave Wallet Recovery Services - Lost the password to your private key? Dave is one of the most trusted people in Bitcoin history to help you recover your lost bitcoin!

Dave Wallet Recovery Services - Lost the password to your private key? Dave is one of the most trusted people in Bitcoin history to help you recover your lost bitcoin! submitted by BitcoinXio to btc [link] [comments]

Dave Wallet Recovery Services - Lost the password to your private key? Dave is one of the most trusted people in Bitcoin history to help you recover your lost bitcoin!

Dave Wallet Recovery Services - Lost the password to your private key? Dave is one of the most trusted people in Bitcoin history to help you recover your lost bitcoin! submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Is it possible to restore my Electrum Wallet with the master private key? (Lost the mnemonic) /r/Bitcoin

Is it possible to restore my Electrum Wallet with the master private key? (Lost the mnemonic) /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Wait a second, if I die without leaving someone my password, does that mean that not only will my family not inherit my bitcoin, but those assets essentially disappear into a digital abyss?!

I read a few articles on this, but they don't fill me with confidence there are clearly obstacles to overcome, it got me thinking about what the future of banking will look like..
submitted by Qwertyotum to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

THE SAME HAPPENED to me as welll !!! HOW CAN I RECOVER!? my 189.928 Litecoin, PLEASE !!! // Litecoin Transferred to Wrong Address

submitted by David_1101 to litecoin [link] [comments]

Is there any way for society to get back the Bitcoin that has been lost?

Bitcoin can get lost/forgotten if someone loses their key or if someone dies without inheriting their Bitcoin to someone else. Is there a way to get that Bitcoin back? If not, could there be a way?
submitted by treboy123 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

When you lose bitcoin, where does it actually go? Does it go somewhere?

Let's suppose, someone shares their wallet address with me and I send them BTC. For some reason, I accidentally make changes in that wallet, like replacing the character in it. The transaction still occurs but the person doesn't get the BTC. Does that bitcoin go anywhere? I might be wrong but I'm sure it doesn't vanishes in the thin air.
I'm sorry for bad English.
submitted by abdullahmnsr2 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

How did people back then store their Bitcoin without the use of hardware wallets/coldcard?

submitted by PumperNikel0 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Drug dealer loses codes for €53.6m bitcoin accounts

submitted by AudibleNod to news [link] [comments]

I forgot about my Bitcoin from 2012

Was going to buy something off Silk Road and pussied out and forgot about it. Probably had around 10 BTCs?
My emails show Bitme and VirWox. No clue on private key but I know transaction ids. Any chance as to how I can access those funds? I’m so retarded.
Is it game over if I don’t know my Private Key or can they be traced by looking at my transaction Ids?? And somehow bring the dot together. Been through multiple laptops in between so not stored in hardware.
I could try to search but how many digits are they usually for that time period? Like do they start with some number or letter? What’s the length size?
I wonder if I can search for a string using python by getting my email API and search for the string that fits the mold. I’m done if I wrote it on some post it’s.
submitted by jackielarson to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What happens to lost/forgotten Bitcoin?

I imagine plenty of people have forgotten about small amounts of Bitcoin or lost a password. What happens to it? There's no authority in charge of it. A traditional bank can track your descendants. Or even seize the funds at some point. Cash can be lost and it doesn't affect the money supply. With a finite supply, what happens to all the bitcoins in the lost and forgotten accounts?
submitted by the-guz to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

My lost bitcoin password. Found!!

After 5 years of tears Dave Bitcoin did it! I was sure it’s lost forever but few days ago got this amazing email from Dave saying he finally found my password. Thank you davebitcoin so much!!
submitted by shiralevi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Ultimate glossary of crypto currency terms, acronyms and abbreviations

I thought it would be really cool to have an ultimate guide for those new to crypto currencies and the terms used. I made this mostly for beginner’s and veterans alike. I’m not sure how much use you will get out of this. Stuff gets lost on Reddit quite easily so I hope this finds its way to you. Included in this list, I have included most of the terms used in crypto-communities. I have compiled this list from a multitude of sources. The list is in alphabetical order and may include some words/terms not exclusive to the crypto world but may be helpful regardless.
2FA
Two factor authentication. I highly advise that you use it.
51% Attack:
A situation where a single malicious individual or group gains control of more than half of a cryptocurrency network’s computing power. Theoretically, it could allow perpetrators to manipulate the system and spend the same coin multiple times, stop other users from completing blocks and make conflicting transactions to a chain that could harm the network.
Address (or Addy):
A unique string of numbers and letters (both upper and lower case) used to send, receive or store cryptocurrency on the network. It is also the public key in a pair of keys needed to sign a digital transaction. Addresses can be shared publicly as a text or in the form of a scannable QR code. They differ between cryptocurrencies. You can’t send Bitcoin to an Ethereum address, for example.
Altcoin (alternative coin): Any digital currency other than Bitcoin. These other currencies are alternatives to Bitcoin regarding features and functionalities (e.g. faster confirmation time, lower price, improved mining algorithm, higher total coin supply). There are hundreds of altcoins, including Ether, Ripple, Litecoin and many many others.
AIRDROP:
An event where the investors/participants are able to receive free tokens or coins into their digital wallet.
AML: Defines Anti-Money Laundering laws**.**
ARBITRAGE:
Getting risk-free profits by trading (simultaneous buying and selling of the cryptocurrency) on two different exchanges which have different prices for the same asset.
Ashdraked:
Being Ashdraked is essentially a more detailed version of being Zhoutonged. It is when you lose all of your invested capital, but you do so specifically by shorting Bitcoin. The expression “Ashdraked” comes from a story of a Romanian cryptocurrency investor who insisted upon shorting BTC, as he had done so successfully in the past. When the price of BTC rose from USD 300 to USD 500, the Romanian investor lost all of his money.
ATH (All Time High):
The highest price ever achieved by a cryptocurrency in its entire history. Alternatively, ATL is all time low
Bearish:
A tendency of prices to fall; a pessimistic expectation that the value of a coin is going to drop.
Bear trap:
A manipulation of a stock or commodity by investors.
Bitcoin:
The very first, and the highest ever valued, mass-market open source and decentralized cryptocurrency and digital payment system that runs on a worldwide peer to peer network. It operates independently of any centralized authorities
Bitconnect:
One of the biggest scams in the crypto world. it was made popular in the meme world by screaming idiot Carlos Matos, who infamously proclaimed," hey hey heeeey” and “what's a what's a what's up wasssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuup, BitConneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeect!”. He is now in the mentally ill meme hall of fame.
Block:
A package of permanently recorded data about transactions occurring every time period (typically about 10 minutes) on the blockchain network. Once a record has been completed and verified, it goes into a blockchain and gives way to the next block. Each block also contains a complex mathematical puzzle with a unique answer, without which new blocks can’t be added to the chain.
Blockchain:
An unchangeable digital record of all transactions ever made in a particular cryptocurrency and shared across thousands of computers worldwide. It has no central authority governing it. Records, or blocks, are chained to each other using a cryptographic signature. They are stored publicly and chronologically, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the term blockchain. Anyone can have access to the database and yet it remains incredibly difficult to hack.
Bullish:
A tendency of prices to rise; an optimistic expectation that a specific cryptocurrency will do well and its value is going to increase.
BTFD:
Buy the fucking dip. This advise was bestowed upon us by the gods themselves. It is the iron code to crypto enthusiasts.
Bull market:
A market that Cryptos are going up.
Consensus:
An agreement among blockchain participants on the validity of data. Consensus is reached when the majority of nodes on the network verify that the transaction is 100% valid.
Crypto bubble:
The instability of cryptocurrencies in terms of price value
Cryptocurrency:
A type of digital currency, secured by strong computer code (cryptography), that operates independently of any middlemen or central authoritie
Cryptography:
The art of converting sensitive data into a format unreadable for unauthorized users, which when decoded would result in a meaningful statement.
Cryptojacking:
The use of someone else’s device and profiting from its computational power to mine cryptocurrency without their knowledge and consent.
Crypto-Valhalla:
When HODLers(holders) eventually cash out they go to a place called crypto-Valhalla. The strong will be separated from the weak and the strong will then be given lambos.
DAO:
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations. It defines A blockchain technology inspired organization or corporation that exists and operates without human intervention.
Dapp (decentralized application):
An open-source application that runs and stores its data on a blockchain network (instead of a central server) to prevent a single failure point. This software is not controlled by the single body – information comes from people providing other people with data or computing power.
Decentralized:
A system with no fundamental control authority that governs the network. Instead, it is jointly managed by all users to the system.
Desktop wallet:
A wallet that stores the private keys on your computer, which allow the spending and management of your bitcoins.
DILDO:
Long red or green candles. This is a crypto signal that tells you that it is not favorable to trade at the moment. Found on candlestick charts.
Digital Signature:
An encrypted digital code attached to an electronic document to prove that the sender is who they say they are and confirm that a transaction is valid and should be accepted by the network.
Double Spending:
An attack on the blockchain where a malicious user manipulates the network by sending digital money to two different recipients at exactly the same time.
DYOR:
Means do your own research.
Encryption:
Converting data into code to protect it from unauthorized access, so that only the intended recipient(s) can decode it.
Eskrow:
the practice of having a third party act as an intermediary in a transaction. This third party holds the funds on and sends them off when the transaction is completed.
Ethereum:
Ethereum is an open source, public, blockchain-based platform that runs smart contracts and allows you to build dapps on it. Ethereum is fueled by the cryptocurrency Ether.
Exchange:
A platform (centralized or decentralized) for exchanging (trading) different forms of cryptocurrencies. These exchanges allow you to exchange cryptos for local currency. Some popular exchanges are Coinbase, Bittrex, Kraken and more.
Faucet:
A website which gives away free cryptocurrencies.
Fiat money:
Fiat currency is legal tender whose value is backed by the government that issued it, such as the US dollar or UK pound.
Fork:
A split in the blockchain, resulting in two separate branches, an original and a new alternate version of the cryptocurrency. As a single blockchain forks into two, they will both run simultaneously on different parts of the network. For example, Bitcoin Cash is a Bitcoin fork.
FOMO:
Fear of missing out.
Frictionless:
A system is frictionless when there are zero transaction costs or trading retraints.
FUD:
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt regarding the crypto market.
Gas:
A fee paid to run transactions, dapps and smart contracts on Ethereum.
Halving:
A 50% decrease in block reward after the mining of a pre-specified number of blocks. Every 4 years, the “reward” for successfully mining a block of bitcoin is reduced by half. This is referred to as “Halving”.
Hardware wallet:
Physical wallet devices that can securely store cryptocurrency maximally. Some examples are Ledger Nano S**,** Digital Bitbox and more**.**
Hash:
The process that takes input data of varying sizes, performs an operation on it and converts it into a fixed size output. It cannot be reversed.
Hashing:
The process by which you mine bitcoin or similar cryptocurrency, by trying to solve the mathematical problem within it, using cryptographic hash functions.
HODL:
A Bitcoin enthusiast once accidentally misspelled the word HOLD and it is now part of the bitcoin legend. It can also mean hold on for dear life.
ICO (Initial Coin Offering):
A blockchain-based fundraising mechanism, or a public crowd sale of a new digital coin, used to raise capital from supporters for an early stage crypto venture. Beware of these as there have been quite a few scams in the past.
John mcAfee:
A man who will one day eat his balls on live television for falsely predicting bitcoin going to 100k. He has also become a small meme within the crypto community for his outlandish claims.
JOMO:
Joy of missing out. For those who are so depressed about missing out their sadness becomes joy.
KYC:
Know your customer(alternatively consumer).
Lambo:
This stands for Lamborghini. A small meme within the investing community where the moment someone gets rich they spend their earnings on a lambo. One day we will all have lambos in crypto-valhalla.
Ledger:
Away from Blockchain, it is a book of financial transactions and balances. In the world of crypto, the blockchain functions as a ledger. A digital currency’s ledger records all transactions which took place on a certain block chain network.
Leverage:
Trading with borrowed capital (margin) in order to increase the potential return of an investment.
Liquidity:
The availability of an asset to be bought and sold easily, without affecting its market price.
of the coins.
Margin trading:
The trading of assets or securities bought with borrowed money.
Market cap/MCAP:
A short-term for Market Capitalization. Market Capitalization refers to the market value of a particular cryptocurrency. It is computed by multiplying the Price of an individual unit of coins by the total circulating supply.
Miner:
A computer participating in any cryptocurrency network performing proof of work. This is usually done to receive block rewards.
Mining:
The act of solving a complex math equation to validate a blockchain transaction using computer processing power and specialized hardware.
Mining contract:
A method of investing in bitcoin mining hardware, allowing anyone to rent out a pre-specified amount of hashing power, for an agreed amount of time. The mining service takes care of hardware maintenance, hosting and electricity costs, making it simpler for investors.
Mining rig:
A computer specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies.
Mooning:
A situation the price of a coin rapidly increases in value. Can also be used as: “I hope bitcoin goes to the moon”
Node:
Any computing device that connects to the blockchain network.
Open source:
The practice of sharing the source code for a piece of computer software, allowing it to be distributed and altered by anyone.
OTC:
Over the counter. Trading is done directly between parties.
P2P (Peer to Peer):
A type of network connection where participants interact directly with each other rather than through a centralized third party. The system allows the exchange of resources from A to B, without having to go through a separate server.
Paper wallet:
A form of “cold storage” where the private keys are printed onto a piece of paper and stored offline. Considered as one of the safest crypto wallets, the truth is that it majors in sweeping coins from your wallets.
Pre mining:
The mining of a cryptocurrency by its developers before it is released to the public.
Proof of stake (POS):
A consensus distribution algorithm which essentially rewards you based upon the amount of the coin that you own. In other words, more investment in the coin will leads to more gain when you mine with this protocol In Proof of Stake, the resource held by the “miner” is their stake in the currency.
PROOF OF WORK (POW) :
The competition of computers competing to solve a tough crypto math problem. The first computer that does this is allowed to create new blocks and record information.” The miner is then usually rewarded via transaction fees.
Protocol:
A standardized set of rules for formatting and processing data.
Public key / private key:
A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into an account. The public key is made available to everyone via a publicly accessible directory, and the private key remains confidential to its respective owner. Because the key pair is mathematically related, whatever is encrypted with a public key may only be decrypted by its corresponding private key.
Pump and dump:
Massive buying and selling activity of cryptocurrencies (sometimes organized and to one’s benefit) which essentially result in a phenomenon where the significant surge in the value of coin followed by a huge crash take place in a short time frame.
Recovery phrase:
A set of phrases you are given whereby you can regain or access your wallet should you lose the private key to your wallets — paper, mobile, desktop, and hardware wallet. These phrases are some random 12–24 words. A recovery Phrase can also be called as Recovery seed, Seed Key, Recovery Key, or Seed Phrase.
REKT:
Referring to the word “wrecked”. It defines a situation whereby an investor or trader who has been ruined utterly following the massive losses suffered in crypto industry.
Ripple:
An alternative payment network to Bitcoin based on similar cryptography. The ripple network uses XRP as currency and is capable of sending any asset type.
ROI:
Return on investment.
Safu:
A crypto term for safe popularized by the Bizonnaci YouTube channel after the CEO of Binance tweeted
“Funds are safe."
“the exchage I use got hacked!”“Oh no, are your funds safu?”
“My coins better be safu!”


Sats/Satoshi:
The smallest fraction of a bitcoin is called a “satoshi” or “sat”. It represents one hundred-millionth of a bitcoin and is named after Satoshi Nakamoto.
Satoshi Nakamoto:
This was the pseudonym for the mysterious creator of Bitcoin.
Scalability:
The ability of a cryptocurrency to contain the massive use of its Blockchain.
Sharding:
A scaling solution for the Blockchain. It is generally a method that allows nodes to have partial copies of the complete blockchain in order to increase overall network performance and consensus speeds.
Shitcoin:
Coin with little potential or future prospects.
Shill:
Spreading buzz by heavily promoting a particular coin in the community to create awareness.
Short position:
Selling of a specific cryptocurrency with an expectation that it will drop in value.
Silk road:
The online marketplace where drugs and other illicit items were traded for Bitcoin. This marketplace is using accessed through “TOR”, and VPNs. In October 2013, a Silk Road was shut down in by the FBI.
Smart Contract:
Certain computational benchmarks or barriers that have to be met in turn for money or data to be deposited or even be used to verify things such as land rights.
Software Wallet:
A crypto wallet that exists purely as software files on a computer. Usually, software wallets can be generated for free from a variety of sources.
Solidity:
A contract-oriented coding language for implementing smart contracts on Ethereum. Its syntax is similar to that of JavaScript.
Stable coin:
A cryptocoin with an extremely low volatility that can be used to trade against the overall market.
Staking:
Staking is the process of actively participating in transaction validation (similar to mining) on a proof-of-stake (PoS) blockchain. On these blockchains, anyone with a minimum-required balance of a specific cryptocurrency can validate transactions and earn Staking rewards.
Surge:
When a crypto currency appreciates or goes up in price.
Tank:
The opposite of mooning. When a coin tanks it can also be described as crashing.
Tendies
For traders , the chief prize is “tendies” (chicken tenders, the treat an overgrown man-child receives for being a “Good Boy”) .
Token:
A unit of value that represents a digital asset built on a blockchain system. A token is usually considered as a “coin” of a cryptocurrency, but it really has a wider functionality.
TOR: “The Onion Router” is a free web browser designed to protect users’ anonymity and resist censorship. Tor is usually used surfing the web anonymously and access sites on the “Darkweb”.
Transaction fee:
An amount of money users are charged from their transaction when sending cryptocurrencies.
Volatility:
A measure of fluctuations in the price of a financial instrument over time. High volatility in bitcoin is seen as risky since its shifting value discourages people from spending or accepting it.
Wallet:
A file that stores all your private keys and communicates with the blockchain to perform transactions. It allows you to send and receive bitcoins securely as well as view your balance and transaction history.
Whale:
An investor that holds a tremendous amount of cryptocurrency. Their extraordinary large holdings allow them to control prices and manipulate the market.
Whitepaper:

A comprehensive report or guide made to understand an issue or help decision making. It is also seen as a technical write up that most cryptocurrencies provide to take a deep look into the structure and plan of the cryptocurrency/Blockchain project. Satoshi Nakamoto was the first to release a whitepaper on Bitcoin, titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” in late 2008.
And with that I finally complete my odyssey. I sincerely hope that this helped you and if you are new, I welcome you to crypto. If you read all of that I hope it increased, you in knowledge.
my final definition:
Crypto-Family:
A collection of all the HODLers and crypto fanatics. A place where all people alike unite over a love for crypto.
We are all in this together as we pioneer the new world that is crypto currency. I wish you a great day and Happy HODLing.
-u/flacciduck
feel free to comment words or terms that you feel should be included or about any errors I made.
Edit1:some fixes were made and added words.
submitted by flacciduck to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

🔥Not your keys, not your coins : Why you should not use Paypal for Bitcoin

Today, PayPal announced that they will be launching a cryptocurrency digital wallet for buying, selling and storing Bitcoin, Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash and Litecoin.
This confirms rumors which circulated earlier this year, and it is seen as a significant milestone by many in the community.
A milestone it may be, but it will impact millions of daily users who have, until now, never considered getting into cryptocurrency. For them, PayPal will be the leading authority in a space that it has long sought to discredit.
Over 221 Billion dollars were transacted in Q2 of 2020 using Paypal. That represents a rise of 10% in volume in just six months. PayPal is growing and dominating online payments as well as other services such as credit and insurance.
It has a long-established reputation of occasionally freezing user funds and censoring payments that conflict with its outlook but the payments giant continues to hold relevance where Bitcoin should have long overtaken it. Perhaps this news marks the beginning of a transition?
Is PayPal’s announcement good news for Bitcoin? Until very recently, PayPal was anti-crypto. Writing in 2018, ex-CEO Bill Harris called Bitcoin “the greatest scam ever”, so what’s changed?
This sudden turnaround is encouraging, especially as private companies like Microstrategy and Square make grandiose announcements about their own crypto diversification.
Should the community embrace them with open arms? After all, this is the start of mass adoption we’ve all been waiting for, right?
When a household brand like PayPal starts selling Bitcoin, it’s probably not because they want to spur healthy adoption. In the press release announcing their new cryptocurrency service, PayPal sends out mixed messages.
On one hand, the service will be entirely custodial, meaning users will not have the key to their own coins, while on the other they intend to “provide account holders with educational content to help them understand the cryptocurrency ecosystem”. The idea that anyone informed about bitcoin would agree to not holding their private keys might indicate that this educational content will overlook the fundamental rule of “Not your keys; not your coins”.
If millions of newcomers are onboarded to Bitcoin by PayPal, there could be a very serious information gap that jeopardizes their experience and undermines key principles of cryptocurrency.
This statement from their FAQ is, in practical terms, false: “You own the Cryptocurrency you buy on PayPal but will not be provided with a private key.” No-one should consider money held entirely by a third party as owned by them.
Time after time, exchanges have lost user funds, often leaving them with no recourse. A benefit for some will be a promise of greater regulation, where funds can be insured and new users may feel more comfortable than dealing with cryptocurrency exchanges directly, but they will be restricted from actually utilizing their coins. The only reasons to own Bitcoin which cannot be used, would be to invest for the long term, which is incredibly reckless to do when your funds are held by a third party, or speculate on its price, which again, would be introducing the masses to financial mechanisms they do not understand.
Is PayPal positioned to be a cryptocurrency leader? As it steps into the forefront, PayPal will be closely watched by companies, institutions, and consumers. While they can boast of “digital payments expertise”, they have historically taken an aggressive stance against users who bought cryptocurrency on exchanges, citing their acceptable use policy, forbidding transactions which “involve currency exchanges or check cashing businesses”.
The fact that this clause remains in their policy suggests that they intend to limit users to use only their platform for cryptocurrency, stifling competition and preventing users from ever withdrawing their cryptocurrency to the safety of a wallet they control the keys to. That said, there is something to be said for PayPal’s statement that they will “enable cryptocurrency as a funding source for digital commerce at its 26 million merchants”. Currently, the options for cryptocurrency funding are in their infancy, and Bitcoin loans could see future growth. There is only one thing about PayPal’s announcement that long-term hodlers will be celebrating today: the pump in price. Long-term, if PayPal proceeds without consulting the community and letting their users control their own keys, it offers no value to the space.
The greatest risk is that the clout they carry in traditional electronic payments will be interpreted as expertise in crypto. This would threaten the expert advice so carefully crafted by our community, which could be drowned out by the misinformed masses that PayPal brings to the space. For now, no-one can tell how it will turn out, but there are big concerns to address before informed users will turn to PayPal.
Welcome PayPal’s initiative with open arms, but by no means look to them for leadership. At best, this announcement indicates that they may fear sinking into irrelevance.
*Do not use PayPal for Bitcoin; there are many other places to buy crypto which will let you keep ownership of your coins. *
PayPal is conceding to Bitcoin, and the many other aspirational, educational projects within the community should be highlighted to prevent newcomers from falling into a trap of trusting one of Bitcoin’s greatest long-term adversaries.
Source : https://blog.trezor.io/why-you-should-not-use-paypal-for-bitcoin-f6e2d436ca96
submitted by mohiemen to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Reminder from previous bull markets

Usually, bull markets attract a lot of new investors - although speculators should be the right word here - and as usual, a lot of them are going to be crushed a way or another.
First, before putting a single dollar, euro or whatever in the market, you should read a lot to know exactly what you're looking for.
Are you here for the tech and/or the cypherpunk ethos ? Great, there's lot of resources out there (my links are cleaned but as always, do your due diligence) :
Now, you've read and you want to put some skin in the game. Several exchanges are acceptable, a lot of aren't, be careful and assume that none really are (know that I won't post any ref links) :
This was for centralized exchanges aka CEX. Talking about custodial, you'll need wallets to store your (bit)coins. Always try to use non-custodial wallets, which means wallets that give you your private keys. This way, if the software goes down, you can always retreive your money. Now, I won't link to all the existing wallets but will advise you to buy hardware wallets (trezor or ledger but there are others) or to create (on off-gap computers) paper wallets you're able to store safely (against all risks, not only robbery but housefire). You also could use your memory with brain wallets but, my gosh, I wouldn't trust myself. For Bitcoin (or even Litecoin), Electrum software can do a good job (but save your keys).
AGAIN, DON'T KEEP YOUR SAVINGS ON AN EXCHANGE
Now, about trading : it's been repeated and repeated but don't chase pumps and altcoins. Yep, it's probably the fastest way to make money. It's also the fastest to lose it. I won't lie : I made good money during the 2017-bullrun and I took profits but I also forgot to sell some shitcoins thinking it would keep going up, now I'm still holding these bags (although I don't really care). I know that a lot forgot to take profits. Take profits, always take profits, whatever your strategy is. Don't fall for people trying to sell you their bags, for ICOs trying to sell you a product which isn't released yet and obviously, don't fall for people asking for your private key.
Also, know that there's two endgames : accumulating bitcoin or fiat. I'm rather in the first team but whatever your strategy is, take profits. (Yes, I know, some will say accumulating ethereum or something else). It's true that a lot of ethereum holders made a lot of money during the last bullrun (ethereum helped me make money too) but I'm really biased in favor of bitcoin (and monero). So, pick your coin but again, do your due diligence.
A lot of people here or there will talk about the best tech, the fact that bitcoin is old and slow. I would need another post to go further on this point but know that a lof of air flight systems are old too but reliable. Trustless and reliable is the point here.
This is the post from someone who bought bitcoin seven or six years ago, who lost part of them, who spent part of them (but don't regret this at all), who is still learning and I hope it will help others, although it would need a book to be complete.
submitted by EmmanuelBlockchain to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

How much help can Hierarchical Deterministic trees of keys help with key management for non-expert users?

I've recently been made aware of BIP32, which was invented to make "Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets" (HD wallets) in BitCoin. I was wondering what uses this could have outside crypto currencies most notably for your "regular" cypherpunk using tools like GPG or Age to communicate with their web of trust.
A deterministic tree of key pairs basically works like this: you start with a root key pair, that must be generated once and never lost or compromised. Then you generate sub-keys by hashing that root key with an easily remembered index). If a sub-key is lost, it can be re-generated from the root key. Now, BIP32 has two ways of generating sub keys, each with their own tradeofs.
Note: I'll use the following names from now on:
G -- Generator of the group (public constant) a -- root private key A = a.G -- root public key b -- child private key B = b.G -- child public key. i -- public index (each child key has its own unique index) 
Hardened keys are generated from the private half of the root key (over-simplified for clarity):
b = KDF(a, i) B = b.G 
Key derivation can't be reversed, so if the child key b happens to be compromised, the root key a is still safe. The advantage of the deterministic generation is that if you lose the child key (you dumped your cell phone, your hard drive fried…) you can re-generate it from the root key, and pretend you never lost it.
Non-hardened keys are generated from the public half of the root key, such that even third parties can generate it:
z = KDF(A, i) Z = z.G b = a + z -- modulo group order B = A + Z B = a.G + z.G B = (a+z).G B = b.G 
Anyone can generate the public key, but generating the private key requires knowledge of the root private key. As far as I know, this is safe, because breaking this scheme would mean that we have solved the Discrete Logarithm Problem. However, if a non-hardened child key b is compromised, so is the root key. z is public (derived from the public root key), so knowing b easily reveals a:
b = a + z a = b - z 
Unless I'm missing something, this means we should not store non-hardened key pairs less securely than we store the root key itself.

Is there a compelling use case?

I was wondering how useful those could be, compared to a simple hierarchy of certified keys, where child keys are generated randomly, and simply signed by their parent key? With those simple hierarchies, you'd simply rotate keys from time to time, and other people would know to trust the new key based on certificate from the parent (or chain of ancestors). If you lose a key, you simply rotate (and sign) a new one.
One obvious advantage of deterministic hardened keys is that we can achieve continuity without relying on a certificate. We can afford to lose them even if we don't have an easy way to rotate them. But… aren't we supposed to rotate keys to begin with?
Then there are the deterministic non hardened keys. I'm not sure what they bring to the table exactly: with Bitcoin, they help you make wallets on the fly without giving your root key to the wallet factory. If I understand correctly, compromising the wallet factory may compromise your identity (we can link its generated keys with your own public key by knowing the indices), but it won't compromise your money (the private halves are still safe, so only you can transfer the coins away from those wallets).
Outside of crypto currencies however, I'm not sure: there's little point sending a message to a non-hardened child key instead of its parent key, since a compromise of the child key is just as bad as compromise of its aren't. One could still generate child keys without revealing the indices, but if you're anonymous, why not just generate a one-time key pair?
Simply put: What a reasonable key management for the paranoid private citizen should look like?
submitted by loup-vaillant to crypto [link] [comments]

Recovering private key of change address from Bitcoin Core

Hello, I am trying to help my mostly Bitcoin-ignorant friend with the following problem:
A long time ago, he mined some BTC using Bitcoin Core client with unecrypted wallet.dat.
Some years later, he added encryption to his client and sent some BTC to someone else ("transaction X"). Then he forgot the password of his wallet.dat.
He had backed up the original (unencrypted) wallet.dat file so I managed to extract private key of his mining address from it and send his funds safely elsewhere.
However, during "transaction X", around 0.7 BTC ended on a new "change address". I cannot access the private key of this "change address" because it was generated after the wallet was encrypted and he forgot the password.
Or is there a way to find this private key, e.g. are the change addresses PKs in Bitcoin Core generated using some non-random derivation algorithm?
I have access to both versions of the wallet.dat file (original unecrypted and later encrypted before "Transaction X")
EDIT: Thanks everyone. The wallet was old (non HD) type so the change address' private key is probably lost forever, unless my friend remembers his password.
submitted by fuxoft to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Not your keys, not your crypto -- is there no space for compromise?

You know, people are always asking if we should always always trust only ourselves and I think the answer is always more nuanced than yes or no.
I wonder if, at some point, if you’re holding crypto and savings as part of a risk diversification strategy, then you also want to consider either taking out insurance on your savings — costly — or allocating some of it to something like Kraken, which would, as a Federal bank, include deposit insurances.
It's a point of failure, for sure, just like keeping money at an exchange but perhaps it's never going to be so straightforward. I'm thinking of the future, where sooner or later, we'll need to think of inheritance. What if we don't have kids. What if we don't have spouses or close friends. What if they're not into Bitcoin and don't want to be. We still want to make sure they get it after we pass on. And not get lost forever when private keys are buried with us.
We might then consider engaging such services for custodial services alongside inheritance plans — so when we die, for example, I can have some assurance that my will is carried out and a custodial entity, perhaps a bank like Kraken, would ensure my crypto is passed on properly.
We use Electrum, Trezor, Bitamp or whatever other sole custody wallet because we believe that “not your keys, not your crypto” but we are acutely aware that everything is about context. Everything is about context, don't you agree?
submitted by BitAmp-Official to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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If you have no record of the private key stored the funds are lost forever, or more correctly you just can never spend them again. As you never had the private key stored on a hard drive, there's not anything you can do to recover it. bitcoin-core private-key wallet-recovery. share improve this question follow asked Feb 28 '18 at 18:14. Sandeep Gupta Sandeep Gupta. 11 3 3 bronze badges. 2. You need a private key to send the coins away. If you don't have the private key, you can't send the coins. – ndsvw Feb 28 '18 at 18:32. add a comment 2 Answers Active Oldest Votes. 2. If you lose the private key for some ... How Do I Recover My Lost Bitcoin Wallet? By Prashant Jha. Bitcoin, the digital currency requires a wallet just like your real-money, but since the Bitcoin is a digital form of currency and it’s basically a bunch of computer codes, you need a specialized form of wallet to keep it safe against the hackers and theft.. Bitcoin wallets come in many shapes and forms and some of the prominent types ... In this informative article, I will show you the way how you can recover your bitcoin and a private key that is lost back with this step. Losing a hardware wallet or your telephone is inconvenient, but it should not be fatal. As long as you have back up your private key, recovering your bitcoin […] If you've lost your private key but still have the hardware wallet and remember the PIN, there's still hope. Transfer your cryptocurrency from the hardware wallet to a blockchain address (or addresses) that you DO hold the private key to. Do note that this could be a lengthy process. Although hardware wallets can hold multiple cryptocurrencies ...

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How To Find Bitcoin Wallet Private Key In Trust Wallet ...

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