Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Full Node ... - raspnode

BiblePay (BBP)

BiblePay (BBP) is a Charity Christian Cryptocurrency that donates 10% of coins to Charity every month, sponsoring orphans
[link]

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy

So this is what software I currently use for privacy, would like some opinions if possible:
Starting with my cellphone, my device is a Google Pixel 3A XL with GrapheneOS flashed, I have the following apps installed:
F-Droid and AuroraOSS (as my app stores), NewPipe (youtube client), Vanadium (web browser), Tutanota and K-9 Mail (for e-mails), OsmAnd+ (for maps), Joplin (notes), Open Camera (camera), OpenBoard and Mozc for Android (Keyboard and Japanese Keyboard), Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX (password manager), LibreTorrent (torrent client), Librera PRO (pdf/epub/mobi reader, I don't own a Kindle nor want to own one so I use my cellphone to read), Tachiyomi (manga reader), Signal (for messaging), Vinyl Music Player, VLC, Simple Gallery Pro and Simple Calendar Pro (I prefer them over stock Graphene options) and I also use Electrum and Samourai (Bitcoin Wallet) and Monerujo (Monero Wallet)
I also have OpenVPN (for VPN) and use a private DNS for ad and tracking blocking (provided by my VPN provider)
I have 3-4 PCs, will go over every single one of them:
my main PC is a desktop PC (that I built myself) that I mainly use for working and other tasks.
It runs Artix Linux (basically Arch Linux without systemd), I use UFW as my firewall (denying all incoming and also denying all outgoing only allowing what is useful) and I also use AppArmor Profiles, I disabled IPV6 and SWAP, configured my VPN connection as well on network settings and I currently run OpenVPN on my computer (my VPN provider allows for multi-hop cascade through OpenVPN in which I can create a custom VPN cascade up to four servers, each consecutive hop re-encrypts my traffic and assigns me a new IP address) and I've also set disk encryption on installation (have set in all of my computers)
As for software: I use Mozilla Firefox as my web browser (I set it to always be in private mode, unchecked suggestions for browsing history, bookmarks, and open tabs, I've also disabled the Firefox data collection in settings and block dangerous and deceptive content, I use DuckDuckGo as my search engine, I use Firefox Home as my default as my homepage. The rest of my tweaks were done in about:config (using privacytools.io site tweaks + geo.enabled = false, network.cookie.lifetimePolicy = 2 and dom.security.https_only_mode as true which are not listed on the site) and the only addons I use are uBlock Origin on Hard Mode and Decentraleyes), KeePassXC (password manager), VIM (use it as a Text Editor and as an IDE for coding), LibreOffice (for working stuff), GIMP (image editor), VLC, qBitTorrent and Tutanota's Desktop Client and Thunderbird (for e-mails)
I also use KVM/QEMU for virtual machines (usually in case I wanna test some distro or use Tails/Whonix)
For my gaming PC (also a desktop I've built myself) I run Manjaro KDE on it, the only apps I have in the system are Firefox (same settings as above), OBS and KVM/QEMU (which I use a Win10 virtual machine for games, there are tutorials on YouTube on how to do so if you're interested). I have the same firewall settings as above, using AppArmor as well and I've also disabled IPV6 and SWAP, I run OpenVPN on it as well as my VPN DNS settings on network settings. I also use different mouse and keyboard on both my PCs and never mix them together.
My other 2 PCs are both laptops, one is a Acer Aspire Nitro I've bought for work (in case I need to work while in a trip or if I wanna work outside etc), it has the same settings and programs as my main PC but I run Gentoo on it. The other laptop is an old ThinkPad that runs Slackware on it, but I rarely use it and this laptop is most of the times not with me for safety reasons.
For some other devices and stuff: I have an Asus RT-AC86U router with OpenWRT flashed on it that I also run OpenVPN config files (this one coming from another provider, I use two VPN providers, on in my PCs and the other in my router), I have a Ledger Nano S as a hardware wallet for both Bitcoin and Monero (most of my cryptocurrency is there, I use hardware wallet for hodling purposes and as my emergency funding) and I have LOTS of USB flash drivers (all of them for Linux Live ISOs purposes), I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite (only gaming console I have, although have not been playing that much on it recently) that I only connect to the internet in case I need to download some updates or play online and after I'm done I immediately disconnect it from the internet.
Some other privacy habits I have are:
I don't own any smart device like Smart TVs (I've been more than 10 years now without watching TV, doesn't even bother me), Smart Fridges or Dishwashers that connect to your internet, ROOMBAS, Smart Home etc, I keep all my money on crypto (and I have a small amount in gold as well, but I rarely invest on it, all my gold is stored in a manual safe here in my apartment) and I only have like, 10 bucks or so in my back account (as soon as I receive any money I just left the necessary in my account to pay bills and put all the rest on crypto, I try to pay everything on crypto or cash), I RARELY use cloud storage, but if I need to, I go with NextCloud and encrypt all my files with VeraCrypt before uploading it, all my VPN services were paid with Bitcoin (I try to pay everything with crypto as previously said) and I never write directly into any website, I usually write my text on a text editor, copy it and paste it on the website (needless to say that I don't use mainstream social media as well)
So, what do you guys think? anything that you would add your recommend me? (before anyone mentions about self-hosting a DNS server using Pi-hole on a Raspberry Pi, I'm actually thinking on doing it in a near future)
EDIT: forgot to mention that I don't watch YouTube on PC on youtube site, I mostly watch youtube's videos on invidio.us and only use the youtube site for watching live streams honestly. And I also barely go outside with my smartphone (only if I really need to) and I usually keep it away from my computers etc.
EDIT 2: also another thing: I covered all my laptop's webcams with black electrical tape, I have a Logitech C922 Pro webcam for my desktop PCs but rarely use it, and when I need to use it, I unplug it as soon as I'm done with it.
submitted by SlackAcademic to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Make your own stakebox. Ultimate beginners guide how to compile any wallet on AARCH64 (Raspbery pi and other SBC)

I contemplated to wrote this for a long time, so it's finally time.
As you know a lot of altcoins uses PoS (Proof-of-stake) way of "mining" coins. Which basically means, that you hold coins on your unlocked wallet and you are receiving stakes as a reward. This requires very little power and it can bring you a lot of rewards, at just 10W from the wall.
So first I am using latest Raspbian on RPI4B 4GB in this example.Setting up Raspbian is not part of this process since it's very well documented. I recommend to change user from pi to something else due to security concerns and you can also do other stuff just search "security Raspberry PI" and you find a lot of articles, but this is not the focus of this guide.
I know there are a lot of guides on the internet, but I am using like 5 sources, so it's compiled what other people wrote and some of my research.
I am using AnyDesk insted of SSH or VNC server, because it works it's ligthweit and it just works.
So after you see the gui of Raspbian, just launch terminal (CTRL + ALT + T) and do basic thing:
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
Than press Y and let it run, after is finished, we need to prepare so dependency packages. Since most of the wallets using Berkeley DB 4.8 we need to obtain it.
So in terminal wrote:
cd cd Downloads wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar -xzvf db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
So wait unti it's finished and than you can delete files in Downloads folder in gui or use:
sudo rm -r [folder] 
So next thing we need to install some libraries.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf pkg-config libssl-dev libcrypto++-dev libevent-dev libminiupnpc-dev libgmp-dev libboost-all-dev devscripts libdb++-dev libsodium-dev 
And pres y and let it run. After that another set of libraries:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libcrypto++- dev libminiupnpc-dev qt5-default 
And then again pres y and let it run. Some wallets need older version of libssl1.0-dev, so for for safe compiling we install that as well:
sudo apt-get install libssl1.0-dev 
Pres y and let it run. Warning don't use sudo-apt get autoremove, since it would wipe this package, since it's old.
Next thing we are going to obtain Bitcoin PPA filest, which can be done like this.
cd /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ sudo nano bitcoin.list 
Paste this in there:
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin/bitcoin/ubuntu artful main 
And CTRL+X and than y, then do this:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv C70EF1F0305A1ADB9986DBD8D46F45428842CE5E sudo apt-get update 
So now we are ready for compiling. So we are going create folders. CD yourself where this folder should be situated, if you for example have plugged in some external drive. Then:
mkdir Crypto cd Crypto 
And then we have to choose wallet which you want to compile. I am choosing Streamies (STRMS) as an example, since it's pretty good coin for staking. So:
mkdir Streamies cd Streamies 
Then go to the github page and click on the green button on the left and click copy to clipboard, which gives you git link.
git clone https://github.com/Streamies/Streamies.git 
Watch the output folder which it creates, it's stated in the first two lines and copy then by highliting the text and CTRL+SHIFT+C copy it to your clipboard.
cd Streamies (this is that git created folder) ./autogen.sh ./configure CPPFLAGS="-I/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include -O2" LDFLAGS="-L/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" sudo make (this could take hours) sudo make install 
And you are done, files is going to be in folder /uslocal/bin (DO NOT delete git created folder, because you are going to need it for faster compiling, when wallet get's and update.)
cd /uslocal/bin 
Now you can list files by:
ls 
And then you can copy/move them where ever you want by using:
sudo mv * [destination full path] 
Let it run and go back to folder where you move those files.
sudo chmod +x streamies-qt (since we want to run wallet) 
In most cases compiled files are going to in format of "shared library" so we need to create script to run it. Open up a text editor from gui or through nano. And paste this to that file:
#!/bin/bash ./streamies-qt 
And save it as a sh file, for example run.sh. Then we need to make it runnable so:
sudo chmod +x run.sh 
Now to run it, it's just:
./run.sh 
And here we are glorious GUI wallet appears and you are done, you can paste blockchain, wallet.dat from other sources, so this migration is pretty easy and you, if you have it on for exaple flash disk.
So this is basic how to compile QT wallets on AARCH64. I am running 7 wallets, 2 of those are Masternodes and RPI 4B 4GB would handle way more, I am at best on half of my RAM.
Some wallets need more package, but it's not much of and issue, since compiling stops and you just copy paste nape which is missing put it in the google and add "apt-get" after the name of package and you are going to see, what is the name of the packages so it can be retreived from package assinstant aka apt-get. So basically:
sudo apt-get install [package name] 
Then press y and again wrote:
sudo make 
This process is going to continue where it was left off, so nothing is going to run from beginning.
Updating wallets is basically exactly same, just repeat steps from "git clone" and after that proceed as it was written above.
So I hope this helps some of you, to use this at home and not on some VPS, if you are anxious as me, to host my wallets on remote server.
submitted by M1chlCZ to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

[MINING] Can anyone help with this? "stratum_subscribe timed out ...retry after 10 seconds"

Hi everyone,
Just as a disclaimer for the beginning, I'm not investing in Bitcoin, I'm not doing this for any profit or reason, it's more for my own interest.
I'm trying to do some mining on my Raspberry Pi 3, and I have set up a wallet, got a pool account with Slush Pool, and installed or the libraries and software needed to run. As far as I am aware I have ran the right code. However, when I run it, I get this:
 ./cpuminer --algo sha256d --url stratum+tcp://eu.stratum.slushpool.com:3333 --user CENSORED --pass CENSORED ** cpuminer-multi 1.3.7 by [email protected] ** [2020-05-18 21:25:38] Starting Stratum on stratum+tcp://eu.stratum.slushpool.com:3333 [2020-05-18 21:25:38] 4 miner threads started, using 'sha256d' algorithm. [2020-05-18 21:26:08] stratum_subscribe timed out [2020-05-18 21:26:08] ...retry after 10 seconds [2020-05-18 21:26:48] stratum_subscribe timed out [2020-05-18 21:26:48] ...retry after 10 seconds [2020-05-18 21:27:28] stratum_subscribe timed out [2020-05-18 21:27:28] ...retry after 10 seconds [2020-05-18 21:28:08] stratum_subscribe timed out [2020-05-18 21:28:08] ...retry after 10 seconds [2020-05-18 21:28:48] stratum_subscribe timed out [2020-05-18 21:28:48] ...retry after 10 seconds 
Anyone have any idea on how to sort this out? Thanks
submitted by SwagBee to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

#Reddcoin ($RDD) Core Wallet Release 3.0.1 - PosV v2 SuperMajority Consensus Upgrade at 45.6% - Required Upgrade

Reddcoin (RDD) Core Wallet v3.0.1 - January 09, 2020
Version 3.0.1 is the official release version of Reddcoin Core. It is available for download at Reddcoin Core's Github repository here: https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases/tag/v3.0.1
This release features PoSV v2.supermajority activation and new staking ruleset (and minor misc fixes). v3.0.1 is still not yet MacOS Catalina compatible. We are still working and should have that fix issued very soon. Sincere apologies to our Mac-using ReddHeads.
It is particularly important that all users upgrade, as once PoSV v2 is enforced, version 4 blocks will be rejected from the network entirely.
Therefore v3.0.1 is a "strongly recommended" update for all users. Note: If you have already installed v3.0.0, this upgrade is not required. If you have not yet upgraded from v2.0.x or earlier, this is a REQUIRED upgrade. Please install the newest version v3.0.1 to avoid losing functionality during supermajority activation of PoSV v2.
Reddcoin Core version 3.0.1 is now available from: https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases Release Notes are available here and replicated below in this announcement: https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/release-notes.md
This is a new major version release of Reddcoin.
Previously, the original and subsequent versions of Reddcoin were taken from a fork of the Litecoin code base.
With the release of Reddcoin V2.0.0, the code was based directly from a fork of Bitcoin. This allows for better source control and feature implementation from upstream changes into the future
With the release of Reddcoin V3.0.0, the PoSV stake reward has been improved to allow for a target 5% network growth, in process re-incentivizing individual network stakers and providing for integrated dev support.
Upgrading to this release is strongly recommended and required for continued operation. Once a supermajority of 90% is reached, old wallets will no longer accept the new v5 blocks.
Please report bugs using the issue tracker at github:
https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/issues
How to Upgrade
If you are running an older version of Reddcoin, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which may take a few minutes for older versions). Run the installer (on Windows) or just copy over /Applications/Reddcoin-Qt (on Mac) or reddcoind/reddcoin-qt (on Linux).
Start wallet. All done!
Reddcoin v3.0.0 introduced an updated PoSV method to better distribute staking rewards and target a overall 5% network growth. Staking and relay policy enhancements 
To implement PoSV v2, Reddcoin Core's block templates are now for version 5 blocks only. When PoSV v2 consensus (Supermajority 9000/10000) is reached, only v5 blocks will be accepted by the network.This equates to approximately 90% of blocks being generated over 1 week period. Status at any time may be viewed in node debug.log
Blockchain Download:
Blockchain data for both testnet and mainnet along with instructions can be downloaded from github. https://github.com/reddcoin-project/bootstrap_files
3.0.1 changelog
*83e212838 - John Nash, 2020-01-09 : really delete these files *3a1458ecd - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-08 : Added missing dependency libminiupnpc-dev for Jessie *d21915431 - Tiago Peralta, 2019-06-21 : Add vout to listtransactions/gettransaction *8d58ea7cf - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-08 : Script for downloading pre compiled binaries for Raspbian Jessie, Stretch or Buster *d4eced1bc - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-08 : Delete reddcoin_core_download_raspbian_stretch.sh *c5e9f91cf - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-08 : Delete reddcoin_core_download_raspbian_jessie.sh *5d5771b00 - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-08 : Delete reddcoin_core_download_raspbian_buster.sh *75c6ae91b - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-05 : add reddcoin-qt and remove starting daemon process *54c501787 - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-05 : add reddcoin-qt and remove starting daemon process *acb30a2b6 - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-05 : script files for Raspbian Jessie (also Stakebox) *cfddbe594 - John Nash, 2020-01-05 : Update copyright year and version *e46e5e7de - John Nash, 2020-01-05 : download script for pre compiled wallet *37386790a - John Nash, 2020-01-05 : change libssl deb packages links to github *9dbc772e6 - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-03 : download script for pre compiled wallet *857d697fd - Oliver Webb, 2020-01-03 : change libssl deb packages links to github *2cb74b9a8 - John Nash, 2019-12-31 : update copyright year *c641a1ab3 - Oliver Webb, 2019-12-30 : Raspberry Pi build script files for v3 wallet *a3f21a4a4 - John Nash, 2019-12-30 : add install script for building db4 update instructions for unix, osx, arm building using the db4 install script *5f6299b2a - John Nash, 2019-12-28 : docs: Update build notes for arm processors *465716c01 - John Nash, 2019-12-28 : test for arm devices *3fec3a535 - John Nash, 2018-02-02 : build: update source paths *5f6031ab4 - John Nash, 2019-12-28 : Scrypt n=1024 Pow hash based upon Colin Percival's Tarnsnap (2009) Modified by Artforz, coblee, pooler, wtogami, Nikolay Belikov, reddink *2fd4d91a0 - John Nash, 2019-12-24 : update copyright year *326828b36 - John Nash, 2019-12-24 : set release state true *8ebede0a6 - John Nash, 2019-12-24 : release notes *36df6fdfb - John Nash, 2019-12-23 : add check explictly for v5 blocks or greater *874dc1f0c - John Nash, 2019-12-17 : remove hardcoded global variable rearrange debug log output *763b25db8 - John Nash, 2019-12-17 : move copyright to new line *536baf635 - John Nash, 2019-12-17 : update version and set release state to false *cde9009f3 - John Nash, 2019-12-17 : update copyright year *ae41b7ed3 - John Nash, 2019-12-17 : set isSuperMajority to 90% for mainnet *e43e1c8ed - John Nash, 2019-12-10 : additional logging to verify isSuperMajority in the debug.log output *e31783cac - John Nash, 2019-12-05 : add/update public key for mainnet *405c6f002 - John Nash, 2019-12-05 : add log output for current inflation rate *9cc43c3f7 - John Nash, 2019-12-02 : determine calculated stake based on posv version *7baa3bf75 - John Nash, 2019-11-25 : check the posv transaction for correct pubkey *9ffa7ca38 - John Nash, 2019-11-21 : check for posv v1 or posv v2 blocks when calculating stake reward *39f7aad68 - John Nash, 2019-11-14 : add logging *0e283e6c3 - John Nash, 2019-11-13 : correct maths *74cbdeffd - John Nash, 2019-11-11 : use new posv v2 functions addidtional logging *35d7413b5 - John Nash, 2019-11-11 : add new proofofstakereward *3d917216c - John Nash, 2019-11-11 : get inflation adjustment *f63d17443 - John Nash, 2019-11-08 : add the developer output split fund output *ca263c9c9 - John Nash, 2019-11-05 : add dev key to chainparams *df6996ab0 - John Nash, 2019-11-05 : add block version checking *14b663479 - John Nash, 2019-11-05 : increase block version
Credits
Thanks to everyone who contributed to coding, testing and feedback for this release, notably:
@cryptognasher @techadept @chris @cryptobuze @harmonyq @mindredder @paxtech @Tiago Peralta 
Stake on!!
-Reddcoin (RDD) Core Development Team
submitted by TechAdept to reddCoin [link] [comments]

How to get Energi Wallet running on Raspberry Pi 4

How to get Energi Wallet running on Raspberry Pi 4
Hello,
I'm new to the Raspberry Pi and trying to get the NRG Core Cryptocurrency wallet running on my Raspberry. Finally I was able to compile the files after this commands:
Download and install the newest updates sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
Install the following major dependencies packages sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf pkg-config libssl-dev libcrypto++-dev libevent-dev libminiupnpc-dev libgmp-dev libboost-all-dev devscripts libdb++-dev libsodium-dev
Install the following QT dependencies packages sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libcrypto++-dev libminiupnpc-dev qt5-default
Install bitcoin PPA files cd /etc/apt/sources.list.d/
sudo nano bitcoin.list
Add this line to the file: deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin/bitcoin/ubuntu artful main
Close file
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv C70EF1F0305A1ADB9986DBD8D46F45428842CE5E
sudo apt-get update
Clone Github cd git clone https://github.com/energicryptocurrency/energi.git
Install Libdb4.8 Libdb4.8-dev Libdb++ Libdb4.8++-dev
Compile the wallet cd energi ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-boost-libdir=/uslib/arm-linux-gnueabihf make sudo make install
After compiling I see the files in /uslocal/bin
https://preview.redd.it/25m1nm8164k41.jpg?width=2016&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=3dfec55b307187eea06a279e284a19a6ae5d6d37
No I need to know how to use this files? Can someone help me please?
submitted by FCU4ever to energicryptocurrency [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Reddcoin on Raspberry Pi

A lot of user asked lately, how to run Reddcoin on the popular Raspberry Pi platform. Raspberry Pi is a cheap ARM computer (using junk leftover chips with 10 year lag in technology) but it has enough RAM and consumes around 5 watts, so its ideal to use it for Reddcoin Staking.
This tutorial is not from me, i take NO RESPONSIBILITY about these binaries or the accuracy. This tutorial is created by cryptoBUZE, a fellow member of the Reddcoin community.
Before attempting to follow this tutorial, do a sudo apt-get update
The following commands must be run to install dependencies:
sudo apt-get install libboost-thread-dev
sudo apt-get install libboost-program-options-dev
sudo apt-get install libboost-filesystem-dev
sudo apt-get install libboost-system-dev
Download and install older libssl version - bitcoin clones are using this glorious and fantastic communist product of openssl so it naturally does not works. Its getting totally incompatible after each relase even with itself. Therefore, you must install this, which is the compatible one with the wallet software (no, you cant even compile the code with the newer one) :
wget http://apt.screenlyapp.com/raspbian/pool/main/o/openssl/libssl1.0.0_1.0.1t-1%2Bdeb8u6_armhf.deb
wget http://apt.screenlyapp.com/raspbian/pool/main/o/openssl/libssl-dev_1.0.1t-1%2Bdeb8u6_armhf.deb
sudo dpkg -i libssl1.0.0_1.0.1t-1+deb8u6_armhf.deb
sudo dpkg -i libssl-dev_1.0.1t-1+deb8u6_armhf.deb
Download the wallet software itself:
wget https://github.com/cryptoBUZE/reddcoin/releases/download/raspberrypi/reddcoind
wget https://github.com/cryptoBUZE/reddcoin/releases/download/raspberrypi/reddcoin-cli
wget https://github.com/cryptoBUZE/reddcoin/releases/download/raspberrypi/reddcoin-qt
chmod +x reddcoin\*
When speaking about compatibility, ARM is similar to x86 if you are running user mode applications. You know that every arm based chip needs a different kernel due to the lack of an unified IO system thankfully for the glorious clueless egoistic communist developers at ARM, who succesfully bankrupted the corporation after 25 or so years, and the company got acquired by the japanese softbank. But in user mode, its sort of backward compatible if you have all the proper libraries installed. This means that this will run on any other newer ARM based machine as well (not just raspberry pi-s, on every other arm stuff, chromebooks, or android phones hacked to work with linux).
submitted by GeriGeriGeri to reddCoin [link] [comments]

FOMO at $3500 & Engaging with Bitcoin without "investing"

Some thoughts at 3500$ for new and old.
Let's say you over-extended yourself and bought 2 BTC at 4k. Consider establishing a stop-loss to limit your liability. You can choose to sell and take the 1000$ loss as a valuable but cheap lesson in speculating; this market is a speculative jungle and you're only making money in the short term by actively playing the market, e.g. if you bought at 3700 and sold at 4400 before price declined again you would be pretty satisfied with yourself.
If you believe bitcoin will eventually become a digital reserve currency or at least see another all time high (ATH) at which you'll sell a portion and want to invest for the long term despite market volatility your other choice is to Dollar Cost Average your crypto. NB: that this does not mean buying in a lump sum, it is profoundly misguided to heavily leverage yourself to "go all in," which is an english phrase used in gambling. If you take this position the wisest course is to budget a small amount you can afford to lose and routinely buy crypto at set intervals regardless of losses.
For example, let's say that you put a small amount once a month into your crypto fund and the price has decreased by 500$/mo. If you bought set amounts at 6k, 5.5k, 5k, 4.5k, 4k, 3.5k then your DCA would be 4.75k/BTC, you're still down but not as badly as if you were to buy once at 6k. Ideally the price will eventually rise, so if you buy down to 3k then at 3.5k, 4k, 4.5k, 5k, 5.5k, 6k, & 6.5k your DCA is still 4.75k/BTC but the price is 6.5k/BTC. Feels pretty good, right? Now take a look at how long it took to get to this point in an improbable perfect scenario: 14 months. Note that this is for demonstration purposes only, not a prediction, and if we actualize sustained growth after this we're probably looking at much longer bumpier road.
If you're new or have pulled out to limit your losses, just be patient and keep watching the price. No one knows how low it will go and trying to anticipate that and exhausting your resources the moment you think we've hit bottom is a recipe for regret. Work on your budget now and when we see a sustained recovery start routinely contributing small amounts to your crypto fund. If you have debt the single most important step you can take towards financial independence is to pay it off and limit your use of credit. Consider building an emergency fund with 3-6 months of expenses before contributing heavily to a risky crypto fund.
Take this exciting/tumultuous period to learn about BTC and how to use it, we contribute to the ecosystem when we participate in further decentralizing the network and the benefits of bitcoin are fully realized when it's used as a currency. Put a wallet on your phone and computer, check out hardware wallets such as the Ledger to store large amounts while keeping spending money on your phone. Offer to accept bitcoin as payment, learn what private keys are and why it's important to hold them yourself rather than letting an exchange hold them. If you just bought some coins on an exchange because everyone is talking about bitcoin but didn't look much further than TAs, you can read this ELI5 article to get you started. Consider reading the Cypherpunk Manifesto and the pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto's Whitepaper. Google what you don't understand, ask what you can't find on Google. Andreas Antonopoulos is a bitcoin expert/evangelist/apologetic and has extensive talks/Q&As on his YT Channel.
If you're "in it for the tech" then consider contributing to the Lightning Network by running a node, if you're a tinkerer Stadicus has a pinned post that's a cool crypto project and costs about 125$. Raspiblitz project is linked in the comments to that thread and incorporates an LCD screen which CBDoctor used to make this legit node/art installation. Alternately you can buy a ready-made Casa node for 300$.
Hopefully y'all will post some additional thoughts and suggestions for further reading/tinkering in the comments.
Nour!
submitted by FortuitousIdiom to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 518 Full Nodes running.

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 518 Full Nodes running.
Official node scanner list: https://scanner.vertcoin.org/nodes
Since every full VTC node can only serve so many clients, it's important to do your part for the Vertcoin network and run your own full node.
Q: WHAT IS A FULL NODE? A: Full nodes maintain a copy of the blockchain/ledger, distribute it to those downloading it, confirm transactions, and further spread out all of the previous functions to make the network more resilient. https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
Q: Do I need to be a miner? A: No, you don't need to be a miner. Miners create new blocks. Full nodes simply share existing blocks (the entire VTC blockchain) with the rest of VTC wallet users.
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node on Intel NUC? A: Intel NUC Vertcoin full node installation done using Windows guide: https://github.com/vertcoin-project/VertDocs/blob/mastedocs/FullNodes/intel-nuc.md
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node? A: It's actually quite easy to do. If you run Vertcoin-QT (Vertcoin Core Wallet) on your PC/MAC desktop, keep it active in the systray. Then, make sure that you map the public port 5889 of your router to the port 5889 on the machine running Vertcoin-QT or vertcoind. For people running a public p2pool node this should be a no-brainer: you already have a synchronized vertcoind. So if you haven't opened port 5889 do it now - it's all you have to do. Your node is then public and can serve blocks and relay transactions.This makes our network much stronger and will help it to perform better. Any old or low power computer is good enough to run a full VTC node. If you have a Raspberry Pi or any old PC lying around, install vertcoind and run it in the background.
Q: How do I know if my Full Node is working correctly? A: To be a full node, you have to check to make sure you are accepting incoming connections. To do that, go under Help -> Debug Window. In the first tab, "Information", there is a Network "Number of Connections" which will show both incoming and outgoing connections. If the "In" is 0, then you are not a full node. If the "In" is greater than 0, you are acting as a full node and supporting VTC blockchain! Thank you!
What is Vertcoin? | Lightning Network SEGWIT Enabled ASIC resistant money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-oMyHDCNc
Linux instructions: https://www.cryptocurrencyfreak.com/2017/09/06/setup-vertcoin-full-node-ubuntu-16-04/
submitted by blockchaintechnology to vertcoin [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Thank you for running your own VTC node and supporting VTC network! We now have 1394 Full Nodes, more than Litecoin

You guys are amazing! :) Thank you for running your own full VTC node and supporting VTC network! We now have 1394 Full Nodes :)
Official node scanner list: https://scanner.vertcoin.org/nodes
Since every full VTC node can only serve so many clients, it's important to do your part for the Vertcoin network and run your own full node.
Q: WHAT IS A FULL NODE? A: Full nodes maintain a copy of the blockchain/ledger, distribute it to those downloading it, confirm transactions, and further spread out all of the previous functions to make the network more resilient. https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
Q: Do I need to be a miner? A: No, you don't need to be a miner. Miners create new blocks. Full nodes simply share existing blocks (the entire VTC blockchain) with the rest of VTC wallet users.
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node? A: It's actually quite easy to do. If you run Vertcoin-QT (Vertcoin Core Wallet) on your PC/MAC desktop, keep it active in the systray. If you have a Raspberry Pi or any old PC lying around, install vertcoind and run it in the background. Then, make sure that you map the public port 5889 of your router to the port 5889 on the machine running Vertcoin-QT or vertcoind. For people running a public p2pool node this should be a no-brainer: you already have a synchronized vertcoind. So if you haven't opened port 5889 do it now - it's all you have to do. Your node is then public and can serve blocks and relay transactions.This makes our network much stronger and will help it to perform better.
Q: How do I know if my Full Node is working correctly? A: To be a full node, you have to check to make sure you are accepting incoming connections. To do that, go under Help -> Debug Window. In the first tab, "Information", there is a Network "Number of Connections" which will show both incoming and outgoing connections. If the "In" is 0, then you are not a full node. If the "In" is greater than 0, you are acting as a full node and supporting VTC blockchain! Thank you!
Why Vertcoin? Learn about why ASIC Resistance matters! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHXqfZWjuHI
Linux instructions: https://www.cryptocurrencyfreak.com/2017/09/06/setup-vertcoin-full-node-ubuntu-16-04/
submitted by blockchaintechnology to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Vertnode - An automated solution for installing Vertcoin node(s) on Single Board Computers

Hello Vertcoin Community,
Eager to contribute to the Vertcoin Community I began creating step by step walkthrough guides on how to get a Vertcoin node up and running on a Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero and Intel NUC. Along with information to get a Vertcoin node up and running was also optional steps to install p2pool-vtc.
I decided that while this step by step guide might be helpful to a few, a setup script may prove to be useful to a wider range of people. I have this script to a point where I think it may be productive to share with a bigger audience, for those who are brave and have this hardware sitting around or like to tinker with projects; I invite you to test this setup script if you are interested, if you run into errors any sort of verbose console output of the error proves to be extremely helpful in troubleshooting.
The script was designed to produce a “headless” server... meaning we will not be using a GUI to configure Vertcoin or check to see how things are running. In fact, once the server is set up, you will only interact with it using command line calls over SSH. The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Why run a headless node on a Single Board Computer?
The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Required: USB Flash Drive 6GB - 32GB
Please note that the script was designed for Single Board Computers first and looks for an accessible USB Flash Drive to use for storing the blockchain and swap file, as constant writing to a microSD can degrade the health of the microSD.
Supports

Hardware

All of the hardware listed above is hardware that I have personally tested / am testing on myself. The plan is to continue expanding my arsenal of single board computers and continue to add support for more hardware to ensure as much compatibility as possible.
Functionality
It is worth noting that LIT can be ran with multiple configurations, the ones displayed in the Post Installation Report reflect values that run LIT with the Vertcoin Mainnet. Please be aware that the Vertcoin Testnet chain has not been mined 100% of the time in the past, if you make transactions on the Vertcoin testnet that do not go through it is likely because the chain has stopped being mined.
BE CAREFUL WITH YOUR COINS, ONLY TEST WITH WHAT YOU ARE OKAY WITH LOSING IF YOU USE THE MAINNET.

Vertcoin Testnet Coins

https://tvtc.blkidx.org/faucet/
I've included some documentation on LIT I created which includes information I found to be useful: https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode/blob/mastedocs/lit.md
Please visit the mit-dci/lit github repository for the most up to date information on lit: https://github.com/mit-dci/lit

Vertnode | Automated Vertcoin Node Installation Script

https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode

Recommended: Use Etcher to install the chosen OS to your microSD card / USB flash drive.

If you intend on installing Ubuntu Server 16.04 to your Intel NUC please use Etcher to install the .iso to your USB flash drive.
https://etcher.io/
PLEASE NOTE THIS SCRIPT MAY GIVE AN ERROR. THIS IS THE NATURE OF TESTING. PLEASE REPORT YOUR ERRORS IF YOU WANT THEM TO BE FIXED/RESOLVED. THANK YOU FOR BETTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SCRIPT.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 Setup Details

You can use different clients to ssh into your node. One option is using PuTTY or Git Bash on Windows which is included in the desktop version of Git. If you are using Linux you can simply open a new terminal window and ssh to the IP address of your node (hardware you intend installing the Vertcoin node on).
You will need to know the IP address of your node, this can be found on your router page.
ssh 192.168.1.5 -l pi For example, this command uses ssh to login to 192.168.1.5 using the -l login name of pi. The IP address of your node will likely be different for you, in this example I am logging into a Raspberry Pi which has a default login name of pi.
A brief list of commands that can be used to check on the Vertcoin node status:
vertcoin-cli getblockchaininfo | Grab information about your blockchain
vertcoin-cli getblockcount | Grab the current count of blocks on your node
vertcoin-cli getconnectioncount | Grab the current count of connections to your node. A number of connections larger than 8 means that you have incoming connections to your node. The default settings are to make 8 outgoing connections. If you want incoming connections please port forward your Raspberry Pi in your Router settings page.
vertcoin-cli getpeerinfo | Grab the information about the peers you have connected to / are connected to
vertcoin-cli getnettotals | Grab network data, how much downloaded/upload displayed in bytes
tail -f ~/.vertcoin/debug.log | Output the latest lines in the Vertcoin debug.log to see verbose information about the Vertcoin daemon (ctrl+c to stop)
Thank you to all who have helped me and inspired me thus far, @b17z, @jamesl22, @vertcoinmarketingteam, @canen, @flakfired, @etang600, @BDF, @tucker178, @Xer0
This work is dedicated to the users of Vertcoin, thank you for making this possible.
7/20/2018 Thank you @CommodoreAmiga for the incredibly generous tip <3
You can reach me @Sam Sepiol#3396 on the Vertcoin Discord, here on reddit or @ [email protected]
submitted by ecorp-sam-sepiol to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 811 Full Nodes running.

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 811 Full Nodes running.
Official node scanner list: https://scanner.vertcoin.org/nodes
Since every full VTC node can only serve so many clients, it's important to do your part for the Vertcoin network and run your own full node.
Q: WHAT IS A FULL NODE? A: Full nodes maintain a copy of the blockchain/ledger, distribute it to those downloading it, confirm transactions, and further spread out all of the previous functions to make the network more resilient. https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
Q: Do I need to be a miner? A: No, you don't need to be a miner. Miners create new blocks. Full nodes simply share existing blocks (the entire VTC blockchain) with the rest of VTC wallet users.
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node? A: It's actually quite easy to do. If you run Vertcoin-QT (Vertcoin Core Wallet) on your PC/MAC desktop, keep it active in the systray. Then, make sure that you map the public port 5889 of your router to the port 5889 on the machine running Vertcoin-QT or vertcoind. For people running a public p2pool node this should be a no-brainer: you already have a synchronized vertcoind. So if you haven't opened port 5889 do it now - it's all you have to do. Your node is then public and can serve blocks and relay transactions.This makes our network much stronger and will help it to perform better. Any old or low power computer is good enough to run a full VTC node. If you have a Raspberry Pi or any old PC lying around, install vertcoind and run it in the background.
Q: How do I know if my Full Node is working correctly? A: To be a full node, you have to check to make sure you are accepting incoming connections. To do that, go under Help -> Debug Window. In the first tab, "Information", there is a Network "Number of Connections" which will show both incoming and outgoing connections. If the "In" is 0, then you are not a full node. If the "In" is greater than 0, you are acting as a full node and supporting VTC blockchain! Thank you!
Why Vertcoin? Learn about why ASIC Resistance matters! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHXqfZWjuHI
Linux instructions: https://www.cryptocurrencyfreak.com/2017/09/06/setup-vertcoin-full-node-ubuntu-16-04/
submitted by blockchaintechnology to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Spock & CoinEx AMA Recap

Spock & CoinEx AMA Recap

https://preview.redd.it/1lagrcjnc9o31.png?width=1074&format=png&auto=webp&s=3136db9ca685dc17477d307df722e5b73ba80030
Spock Network is a decentralized storage platform. In the early stage, Spock Network mainly stores Proof of Capacity (POC) consensus data to effectively utilize the most suitable decentralization technology to encourage miners providing hard disk space. Recently, Spock has been growing rapidly and getting listed on four famous exchanges including CoinEx. On Sept. 19, CoinEx will launch Accelerator for Spock, allowing users to subscribe SPOK with 0.0075 USD. Besides, in order to help our users to dig more about Spock, we have invited the open source code contributor of Spock, Titian Xie, to throw an AMA among our community. Below is the recap of the AMA and enjoy your reading!

Q1: How will Spock solve the existing problems in blockchain?
A: Spock is a decentralized storage application network. Judged from the current development of blockchain technology, PoC is the only choice for a decentralized incentive mechanism in a distributed network composed of a large amount of hard disk space and bandwidth. On one hand, this solves the problem of excessive power consumption in the current mining industry, and on the other hand, it solves the problem of fair competition among a large number of existing hard-disk mining machines. At the same time, on that basis, Spock also supports Solidity smart contracts, which makes the entire ecosystem more prosperous.
Q2: Could you please say something about the team?
A: The core members of our team are all early users on Bitcointalk forum and developers of Burst. They are very familiar with the technology development trend and the details of the bottom of the blockchain technology. Even I with such a R&D background could only throw myself down at their feet in admiration. Their ideals are also very pure, that is, to make Spock a community coin like Bitcoin and Litecoin.
Q3: Community building has just started. What will you do to build the social media that remain active and continuously focus on Spock?
A: Spock is a decentralized application platform. The community also relies on spontaneous word of mouth. Since Spock was put on the test net and later on the main net, many miners and holders have spontaneously joined in to become owners, and maintained and promoted the community. The upcoming Solidity smart contracts can be carried out by polling among the holders, and members of the community will vote through the smart contract to determine the project function expansion and community governance.
Q4: Spock is a decentralized storage application platform, so what advantages does it have compared with the traditional centralized storage platform?
A: Traditional centralized storage platforms generally adopt cloud storage. Most of the data is stored on a few cloud platforms, which leads to serious centralization problems arising from data accumulation. There are also problems including higher cost, slower transfer rate, and poorer data security. The decentralized storage application platform encrypts and distributes data through a distributed network, meaning that no party, other than the data holder, could get access to the data, thus ensuring security. And one of the key issues is that the open decentralized platform can do better in protecting private data. As with the case of the assets of the digital assets of Huobi, the private key represents the ownership of the assets, and, on the decentralized storage platform, it can represent the disposition and access rights of the data.
Q5: Spock adopts the consensus mechanism of PoC. What advantages and disadvantages does PoC have compared with PoW and PoS?
A: In terms of resource usage, PoC is just between PoW and PoS, unlike PoW which consumes a lot of power, or PoS that almost costs nothing. Besides, since the core mechanism of PoC is similar to storing the “hashrate” of PoW on the hard disk, it also makes it possible for the mining equipment to mine in different projects at the same time, provided that several different projects use the same data structure.
Q6: We noticed that Spock also introduced the PoS mechanism on the basis of PoC. What is the consideration?
A: With the POS mechanism added in SPOCK, when a miner package a block, if its address balance satisfies the condition, he or she get get all the proceeds; otherwise, the proceeds will be reduced, and those that fail to meet the conditions will be destroyed. So in my opinion, developers introduce POS mechanisms to create a more equitable and sustainable ecosystem.
Q7: What will the team do to attract more developers to join the Spock ecosystem?
A: Spock is the first public link that supports the Solidity Smart Contract and has been put on the main net. It allows developers to port the DApp on the Ethernet to the network at a very low cost, while developers can design the mining and pledge mechanisms for the tokens of PoC distributed on this network.
Q8: What is the form of Spock mining? What are the conditions for miner application?
A: In SPOCK, mining is carried out through the storage device. First, you write the result of the hash calculation to the device, and reduce the huge hash calculation required in PoW algorithm by retrieving the data in the hard disk. Only a small amount of hash calculation will be required in execution stage. You can mine as long as you have storage equipment and meet the hashrate conditions. Ordinary miners just need an ordinary computer with a hard disk and access to the internet, then they need to go through hard drive mapping, download the wallet, install nodes and so on before mining.
Q9: I am a Windows phone user. How do I download a SPOK wallet?
A: At present there is only the Android version. Versions of other platforms are subject to the official arrangement.
Q10: Miners don’t know how much hashrate they have or how much they could pledge.
A: Check http://www.spockpool.com. There is a calculator to check the amount of pledges required for the time being.
Q11: Does the mining cost anything or a certain amount of SPOK tokens?
A: Now we have a market for cooperative mining. Miners can borrow tokens from owners for mortgage.
Q12: Is there a detailed tutorial for mining?
A:https://www.spockchain.org/download/SpockChain%20Mining%20Tutorial%20V1.3.2.pdf
Q13: What are the advantages compared with Lambda or such? The larger the hard disk, the higher the hashrate?
A: My suggestion is to experience the mining process on both official sites so you may understand the differences between them.
Q14: Can we use the Raspberry Pi to mine at home?
A: Yes, theoretically. Yet the weak computing power of Raspberry Pi itself may affect efficiency in hard drive mapping.

This is the end of the sharing. See you next time!
If you have any suggestions, please submit a Ticket here: https://support.coinex.com/hc/en-us/requests/new
submitted by CoinExcom to Coinex [link] [comments]

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 518 Full Nodes running.

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 518 Full Nodes running.
Since every full VTC node can only serve so many clients, it's important to do your part for the Vertcoin network and run your own full node.
Q: WHAT IS A FULL NODE? A: Full nodes maintain a copy of the blockchain/ledger, distribute it to those downloading it, confirm transactions, and further spread out all of the previous functions to make the network more resilient. https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
Q: Do I need to be a miner? A: No, you don't need to be a miner. Miners create new blocks. Full nodes simply share existing blocks (the entire VTC blockchain) with the rest of VTC wallet users.
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node on Intel NUC? A: Intel NUC Vertcoin full node installation done using Windows guide: https://github.com/vertcoin-project/VertDocs/blob/mastedocs/FullNodes/intel-nuc.md
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node? A: It's actually quite easy to do. If you run Vertcoin-QT (Vertcoin Core Wallet) on your PC/MAC desktop, keep it active in the systray. Then, make sure that you map the public port 5889 of your router to the port 5889 on the machine running Vertcoin-QT or vertcoind. For people running a public p2pool node this should be a no-brainer: you already have a synchronized vertcoind. So if you haven't opened port 5889 do it now - it's all you have to do. Your node is then public and can serve blocks and relay transactions.This makes our network much stronger and will help it to perform better. Any old or low power computer is good enough to run a full VTC node. If you have a Raspberry Pi or any old PC lying around, install vertcoind and run it in the background.
Q: How do I know if my Full Node is working correctly? A: To be a full node, you have to check to make sure you are accepting incoming connections. To do that, go under Help -> Debug Window. In the first tab, "Information", there is a Network "Number of Connections" which will show both incoming and outgoing connections. If the "In" is 0, then you are not a full node. If the "In" is greater than 0, you are acting as a full node and supporting VTC blockchain! Thank you!
Q: Vertnode - An automated solution for installing Vertcoin node(s) on Single Board Computers A: https://www.reddit.com/vertcoin/comments/901e6a/vertnode_an_automated_solution_for_installing/
What is Vertcoin? | Lightning Network SEGWIT Enabled ASIC resistant money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-oMyHDCNc
Official node scanner list (NOT RELIABLE, current node count could be much much higher. If you are a developer, please help us make a better Node Scanner): https://scanner.vertcoin.org/nodes
Linux instructions: https://www.cryptocurrencyfreak.com/2017/09/06/setup-vertcoin-full-node-ubuntu-16-04/
submitted by blockchaintechnology to vertcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - November 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 23rd monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in November 2018
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Research
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
Congratulations Bitcoin on about to be 1 Million subscribers! See you next month!
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Staking Nebilo - How To Guide!

Hey! I’m relatively new to Cryptos and the dark arts of how it ‘really’ works – I got into it because I heard that a friend of a friend had bought $13,000 worth of XRP at $0.30 and sold it all at pretty much the all time high. Naturally you could forgive me for thinking that this is easy!
Since then I’ve tried trading and to be totally honest, it doesn’t play to my strengths. I’m at my best when I find an opportunity and hold (I make no apologies for spelling that correctly either!). I’ve only come across 3-4 coins that have caught my attention so far and I’ve been through nearly all of them in the top 300 and a lot of them outside of that (as well as multiple ICO’s).
Now you know a little bit about my background and how I got into Cryptos – the purpose of this post is to help all the NEBL holders/owners out there understand that by leaving your NEBL in an online exchanges such as Binance you are letting them earn interest on your investment! Nebilo is a Proof of Stake (PoS) coin and PoS is a category of consensus algorithms for public blockchains, which Neblio’s algorithm is a part of. It serves a similar function to the proof of work which underpins the security behind Bitcoin, but has significant advantages in terms of security and energy efficiency.
There are multiple links that I used to get me set up, as well as some really useful help from Telegram user ‘rejoin**’ The only problem was that to someone who has completely no idea about how to use anything other than Microsoft Excel, Word or Powerpoint – answers like ‘it’s simple’ weren’t really what I was looking for.
Cutting to the chase – here is a full guide to help people with ‘staking’ https://nebl.io/2017/07/01/staking-explained/ for the Raspberry Pi 3 – it should however help anyone looking to stake as the basic principles are the same across the board.
Step 1 - Buy the Pi
Assuming that you’re here because you’ve already bought NEBL – the first thing that you need to do is decide what device you want to stake on. Personally I went for the Raspberry Pi 3 (RP3) – it’s low energy consumption and it was as simple as that for me. I bought mine on Amazon for around £45 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Raspberry-Pi-Official-Desktop-Startedp/B01CI58722/ref=sr_1_5?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1517059342&sr=1-5&keywords=raspberry%2Bpi%2B3&th=1
Step 2 - Setting up the Pi
The lovely postman turns up and hands you your package – opening it is quite an experience in itself, there is virtually nothing there, apart from a circuit board, power cable and a few bits of plastic. Prepare to be amazed! To get set up – the best work through I found is this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbJB3387xUw
Apologies in advance, but that isn’t Donald Trump. Looks pretty close though.
Step 3 - Download the wallet
There are lots of wallets to choose from - https://nebl.io/wallets/ - but for the sake of this how to guide – make sure you go on your RP3 and download the RP3 wallet.
You can either copy the script from the webpage – or this post. You will need to click on the ‘Terminal’ on the RP3 – paste this exactly into the terminal and it will start to install the wallet. The terminal can be found pinned to the taskbar on the RP3 - it looks a bit like the 'run' feature on Windows.
'curl https://raw.githubusercontent.com/NeblioTeam/NEBL-Pi/masteNEBL-Pi-Installer.sh | bash -s -- -q'
I don’t know about you – but I was already pretty amazed at this point (doesn’t take a lot… I know).
Step 4 - Syncing
Once you’ve done the step 3, you should be presented with a neblio wallet on your RP3 desktop. We’ll leave that bit there for now – it will need start to sync and you’ll see a certain number of blocks processing etc, so now we need to concentrate on getting yourself set up with a firewall and making sure your RP3 doesn’t power down (if it does, then your node will not count at active and staking will not be live).
Step 5 – Encrypt your wallet
This is a very important part of the process – to stake, your wallet must be unlocked, but encrypted – make sure you take the time here to set a complex password that only you know. To encrypt your wallet – click on ‘settings’ and then ‘encrypt wallet’.
Step 6 – Downloading a firewall
Now you’re welcome to google this (I did when it was explained to me), so once you have – go to your terminal again and type in the following one after another.
sudo apt-get install ufw –y (copy, paste and then press enter)
sudo ufw enable (let it run, copy, paste and then press enter)
sudo ufw allow 6325 (let it run, copy, paste and then press enter)
Step 7 – Setting your RP3 to stay awake (Optional - I did this purely for peace of mind)
There might well be a better way of doing this and if there is, please let me know and I’ll update this post… but this was the best video I found for this was here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWKSTsWwOTk
I went into the feature that you install and set all the minutes to the highest possible values (which I believe are 720 minutes).
Step 8 – Send your NEBL’s
Now that you have your wallet set up with firewall and the RP3 won’t sleep – It’s time to get move your NEBL’s from Binance or whatever other exchange you’re using. Click on ‘receive tokens’ and you’ll be presented with your wallet address. I always send 1 token first to test the route works – yeah you get charged 0.01 NEBL, but for me I prefer the safety route first.
The only thing to note is that it is best to stake in as higher group as possible. If for example you have 1000 NEBL and you transferred them across in 4 batches of 250 – you would have 4 staking groups of 250 each.
If you’re OK with sending them to yourself in one go, then go for it and we’re nearly there!
Step 9 – Unlock your wallet
In order to stake, you must have your wallet open – this allows you to become part of the blockchain and act as a node in the wider Neblio network. Through being open you process the transactions through the network and earn fees.
Step 10 – Wait and earn!
Now that you’ve got all your NEBL’s in your wallet and it is unlocked and encrypted (please make sure you’ve done this!!) it will take 24 hours at least for your coins to mature, you will see a stack of coins in the bottom right hand corner, when these are white it means they are not currently staking. As soon as these have changed to black, it will tell you your weight and how many days until you get your reward for supporting the Neblio Blockchain!
If anyone found this step by step guide of any use – Any donations gratefully received! Oh... and please backup your wallet! There are guides for this when you download the wallet.
NEBL - Nex9xcgNcmjPKBp9LA85cpmS44tJewsFp2
Further help can be found in the Neblio Telegram Group - https://t.me/joinchat/GFVgz0G-oVXOIJGfFYD-vg
submitted by danjel888 to Neblio [link] [comments]

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 867 Full Nodes running.

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 867 Full Nodes running.
Official node scanner list: https://scanner.vertcoin.org/nodes
Since every full VTC node can only serve so many clients, it's important to do your part for the Vertcoin network and run your own full node.
Q: WHAT IS A FULL NODE? A: Full nodes maintain a copy of the blockchain/ledger, distribute it to those downloading it, confirm transactions, and further spread out all of the previous functions to make the network more resilient. https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
Q: Do I need to be a miner? A: No, you don't need to be a miner. Miners create new blocks. Full nodes simply share existing blocks (the entire VTC blockchain) with the rest of VTC wallet users.
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node? A: It's actually quite easy to do. If you run Vertcoin-QT (Vertcoin Core Wallet) on your PC/MAC desktop, keep it active in the systray. Then, make sure that you map the public port 5889 of your router to the port 5889 on the machine running Vertcoin-QT or vertcoind. For people running a public p2pool node this should be a no-brainer: you already have a synchronized vertcoind. So if you haven't opened port 5889 do it now - it's all you have to do. Your node is then public and can serve blocks and relay transactions.This makes our network much stronger and will help it to perform better. Any old or low power computer is good enough to run a full VTC node. If you have a Raspberry Pi or any old PC lying around, install vertcoind and run it in the background.
Q: How do I know if my Full Node is working correctly? A: To be a full node, you have to check to make sure you are accepting incoming connections. To do that, go under Help -> Debug Window. In the first tab, "Information", there is a Network "Number of Connections" which will show both incoming and outgoing connections. If the "In" is 0, then you are not a full node. If the "In" is greater than 0, you are acting as a full node and supporting VTC blockchain! Thank you!
What is Vertcoin? | Lightning Network SEGWIT Enabled ASIC resistant money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-oMyHDCNc
Linux instructions: https://www.cryptocurrencyfreak.com/2017/09/06/setup-vertcoin-full-node-ubuntu-16-04/
submitted by blockchaintechnology to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 500+ Full Nodes running.

Thank you for running your own full Vertcoin node and supporting VTC network! We currently have 500+ Full Nodes running.
Official node scanner list (NOT RELIABLE, current node count could be much much higher. If you are a developer, please help us make a better Node Scanner): https://scanner.vertcoin.org/nodes
Since every full VTC node can only serve so many clients, it's important to do your part for the Vertcoin network and run your own full node.
Q: WHAT IS A FULL NODE? A: Full nodes maintain a copy of the blockchain/ledger, distribute it to those downloading it, confirm transactions, and further spread out all of the previous functions to make the network more resilient. https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
Q: Do I need to be a miner? A: No, you don't need to be a miner. Miners create new blocks. Full nodes simply share existing blocks (the entire VTC blockchain) with the rest of VTC wallet users.
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node on Intel NUC? A: Intel NUC Vertcoin full node installation done using Windows guide: https://github.com/vertcoin-project/VertDocs/blob/mastedocs/FullNodes/intel-nuc.md
Q: How do I run a Full VTC node? A: It's actually quite easy to do. If you run Vertcoin-QT (Vertcoin Core Wallet) on your PC/MAC desktop, keep it active in the systray. Then, make sure that you map the public port 5889 of your router to the port 5889 on the machine running Vertcoin-QT or vertcoind. For people running a public p2pool node this should be a no-brainer: you already have a synchronized vertcoind. So if you haven't opened port 5889 do it now - it's all you have to do. Your node is then public and can serve blocks and relay transactions.This makes our network much stronger and will help it to perform better. Any old or low power computer is good enough to run a full VTC node. If you have a Raspberry Pi or any old PC lying around, install vertcoind and run it in the background.
Q: How do I know if my Full Node is working correctly? A: To be a full node, you have to check to make sure you are accepting incoming connections. To do that, go under Help -> Debug Window. In the first tab, "Information", there is a Network "Number of Connections" which will show both incoming and outgoing connections. If the "In" is 0, then you are not a full node. If the "In" is greater than 0, you are acting as a full node and supporting VTC blockchain! Thank you!
What is Vertcoin? | Lightning Network SEGWIT Enabled ASIC resistant money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-oMyHDCNc
Linux instructions: https://www.cryptocurrencyfreak.com/2017/09/06/setup-vertcoin-full-node-ubuntu-16-04/
submitted by blockchaintechnology to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Soo after almost 3 months of setting up I have my own LN full node running on RP3

Soo after almost 3 months of setting up I have my own LN full node running on RP3
I have been eager to try LN mainnet since the very beginning of it. I've found out about lnd, eclair, zap and other wallets but every scenario I tried to use it failed because of critical issues:
  • eclair does not really constitute a wallet, it's more like a credit card - you can send money but not receive it
  • lnd is okay, but requires a server and tons of resources for maintaining a full node, can't be used securely, efficiently and mobily at the same time
  • zap offers some cloud wallet (in testnet!) by default, this is a serious misunderstanding of my cryptoanarchy needs
  • web wallets - ah, forget it
So I've decided to use my Raspberry Pi with a very old laptop HDD attached (200GB so the pruning function has to be used) to create a backend wallet service and zap desktop (temporarily!) as my frontend control panel.
https://preview.redd.it/0vcq147887q11.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=7bb6eccdd4110a857e5af0400acc2d7e1ee7ee85
Setting up Pi is easy, lots of tutorials over the internet, not gonna discuss it here. Then I had to obtain bitcoind (current rel: bitcoin-0.17.0-arm-linux-gnueabihf.tar.gz) and lnd (lnd-linux-armv7-v0.5-beta.tar.gz), create a bitcoin technical user, deploy the tools, configure and install new systemd services and go through the configs. This is a tricky part, so let's share:
# Generated by https://jlopp.github.io/bitcoin-core-config-generato # This config should be placed in following path: # ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf # [core] # Set database cache size in megabytes; machines sync faster with a larger cache. Recommend setting as high as possible based upon machine's available RAM. dbcache=100 # Keep at most  unconnectable transactions in memory. maxorphantx=10 # Keep the transaction memory pool below  megabytes. maxmempool=50 # Reduce storage requirements by only storing most recent N MiB of block. This mode is incompatible with -txindex and -rescan. WARNING: Reverting this setting requires re-downloading the entire blockchain. (default: 0 = disable pruning blocks, 1 = allow manual pruning via RPC, greater than 550 = automatically prune blocks to stay under target size in MiB). prune=153600 # [network] # Maintain at most N connections to peers. maxconnections=40 # Use UPnP to map the listening port. upnp=1 # Tries to keep outbound traffic under the given target (in MiB per 24h), 0 = no limit. maxuploadtarget=5000 # [debug] # Log IP Addresses in debug output. logips=1 # [rpc] # Accept public REST requests. rest=1 # [wallet] # Do not load the wallet and disable wallet RPC calls. disablewallet=1 # [zeromq] # Enable publishing of raw block hex to 
. zmqpubrawblock=tcp://127.0.0.1:28332 # Enable publishing of raw transaction hex to
. zmqpubrawtx=tcp://127.0.0.1:28333 # [rpc] # Accept command line and JSON-RPC commands. server=1 # Username and hashed password for JSON-RPC connections. The field comes in the format: :$. RPC clients connect using rpcuser=/rpcpassword= arguments. You can generate this value with the ./share/rpcauth/rpcauth.py script in the Bitcoin Core repository. This option can be specified multiple times. rpcauth=xxx:yyy$zzz
Whooaa, this online config generator is really helpful, but I still had to manually correct a few things. The last line is obviously generated by rpcauth.py, I disabled the wallet functionality as lnd is going to take care of my funds. ZMQ is not available to the network so only my LND can use it, RPC usage I still have to think through a little, in general I would like to have my own block explorer some day but also be safe from any hacking attempts (thus I would need at least 2 RPC ports/user accounts - one for lnd, one for block explorer frontend). No ports open on firewall at this time, only UPnP is active and gently opens 8333 for block/tx transfers.
Now, synchronizing the blockchain took me time from mid-July to early September... The hard drive is really slow, also my external HDD drive has some trouble with its A/C adapter so Pi was getting undervoltage alerts all the time. Luckily, it is just downclocking when it happens and slowly but steadily synchronized the whole history. After all, I'm not paying even $5 monthly for a VPS, it is by design the cheapest hardware I could use to set up my LN wallet.
When bitcoind was ready (I've heard some stories about btcd but I don't trust this software yet, sorry), it's time to configure lnd.conf:
[Application Options] debuglevel=trace rpclisten=0.0.0.0:10009 externalip=X.X.X.X:9735 listen=0.0.0.0:9735 alias=X color=#XXXXXX [Bitcoin] bitcoin.active=1 bitcoin.mainnet=1 bitcoin.node=bitcoind [Bitcoind] bitcoind.rpchost=127.0.0.1 bitcoind.rpcuser=X bitcoind.rpcpass=X bitcoind.zmqpubrawblock=tcp://127.0.0.1:28332 bitcoind.zmqpubrawtx=tcp://127.0.0.1:28333 
Here I've had to XXX a little more fields, as not only the bitcoind RPC credentials are stored here, but also my node's public information (it should be illegal to run nodes without specifically selected color and alias!). It is public (and I had to open port 9735 on my firewall), but not necessarily connected to my reddit account for most of the adversaries, so let's keep it this way. In fact, I also see a security vulnerability here: my whole node's stability depends on the IP being static. I could swap it for a .tk domain but who can tell if the bad guys won't actively fight DNS system in order to prevent global economic revolution? As such, I would rather see node identification in LN based on a public key only with possible *hints* of last-known-ip-address but the whole discovery should be performed by the nodes themself in a p2p manner, obviously preventing malicious actors from poisoning the network in some way. For now, I consider the IP stability a weak link and will probably have to pay extra Bitcoin TX fees when something happens to it (not much of a cost luckily!).

https://preview.redd.it/hjd1nooo77q11.png?width=741&format=png&auto=webp&s=14214fc36e3edf139faade930f4069fc31a3e883
Okay then, lnd is up and running, had to create a wallet and give it a night for getting up to speed. I don't know really what took it so long, I'm not using Windows nor 'localhost' in the config so the issues like #1027 are not the case. But there are others like #1545 still open so I'm not going to ponder much on this. I haven't really got any idea how to automatically unlock the wallet after Pi restart (could happen any time!), especially since I only tried to unlock it locally with lncli (why would I enter the password anywhere outside that host?), but let's say that my wallet will only be as stable as my cheap hardware. That's okay for the beta phase.
Finally, zap-desktop required me to copy tls.cert and admin.macaroon files to my desktop. If my understanding of macaroon (it's like an authentication cookie, that can later be revoked) is correct then it's not an issue, however it would be nice to have a "$50 daily limit" macaroon file in the future too, just to avoid any big issues when my client machine gets stolen. Thanks to this, I can ignore the silly cloud-based modes and have fully-secure environment of my home network being the only link from me to my money.
https://preview.redd.it/11bw3dgw47q11.png?width=836&format=png&auto=webp&s=b7fa7c88d14f22441cbbfc0db036cddfd7ea8424
Aaand there it is. The IP took some time to advertise, I use 1ml.com to see if my node is there. The zap interface (ZapDesktop-linux-amd64-v0.2.2-beta.deb) lacks lots of useful information so I keep learning lncli syntax to get more data about my new peers or the routes offered. The transactions indeed run fast and are ridiculously cheap. I would really love to run Eclair with the same settings but it doesn't seem to support custom lnd (why?). In fact, since all I need is really a lncli wrapper, maybe it will be easy to write my own (seen some web gui which weighs 700MB after downloading all dependencies with npm - SICK!). Zap for iOS alpha test registration is DOWN so I couldn't try it (and I'm not sure if it allows custom lnd selection), Zap for Android doesn't even exist yet... I made a few demo transactions and now I will explore all those fancy t-shirt stores as long as the prices are still in "early investor" mode - I remember times when one could get 0.001 BTC from a faucet...
https://preview.redd.it/42sdyoce57q11.png?width=836&format=png&auto=webp&s=7ec8917eaf8f3329d51ce3e30e455254027de0ee
If you find any of the facts presented by me false, I am happy to find out more in the discussion. However what I did I did mostly for fun, without paying much attention to the source code, documentation and endless issue lists on github. By no means I claim this tutorial will work for you but I do think I shared the key points and effort estimations to help others decide if they want a full-node LN client too. I'm also interested in some ideas on what to do with it next (rather unlikely that I will share my lnd admin.macaroon with anyone!) especially if it gives me free money. For example, I can open 1000 channels and start earning money from fees, although I no longer have more Bitcoins than the LN capacity yields... I will probably keep updating the software on my Pi until it leaves beta phases and only then will pour more money inside. I'm also keen on improving the general security of my rig and those comments I will answer more seriously.
submitted by pabou to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Mine for Bitcoin with a Raspberry Pi - Part 1 of 2 How to install Bitcoin Core wallet in any Linux distribution Bitcoin Miner Setup : Raspberry Pi - YouTube Raspberry Pi 3+ Bitcoin Mining (Bitmain AntMiner U3) How to install Neblio (NEBL) QT Wallet on a Raspberry Pi for staking - Step by Step Tutorial (Eng)

This article explains how to set up Raspbian OS (Variant of Debian Linux) on a Raspberry Pi, how to install Bitcoin Core, Electrum Personal Server (EPS), and Electrum Desktop Wallet, and then privately connect the Wallet to Bitcoin Core via EPS. Arman The Parman. Oct 6 · 22 min read. Before the “How” to run your own node, if you would like to learn “Why” you should run your own ... Raspbian is a good choice, and really simple to install. Raspberry Pi Crypto Wallet. There are several options for running a cryptocurrency node on a Raspberry Pi. Raspnode. While Raspnode is no longer maintained, it still functions fine. Make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Wallet PiTrezor : A DIY bitcoin hardware wallet based on trezor and raspberry pi zero Hardware wallet are one of the most secure way to handle your cryptocurrency like bitcoin. The trezor is a hardware bitcoin and other cryptocurrency wallet made by satoshilabs used to secure online transactions. One thing you might notice is that the Raspberry Pi doesn't ship with storage. So generally Raspberry Pi users will run the operating system on a small-ish micro SD card. But because running a full node involves downloading the entire Bitcoin blockchain, which is a few hundred gigabytes (and growing), we're going to add an external hard drive ... This tutorial is to install Bitcoin Core v0.13.0 (or possibly higher) on a Raspberry Pi 2 or 3. Options are given to install the GUI and wallet or not. We'll store the blockchain on an external USB flash drive (or hard drive), as that is more modular and better than storing it on a large microSD card with the OS.

[index] [18264] [10805] [48821] [6133] [41984] [40316] [3228] [25918] [30460] [35645]

How to Mine for Bitcoin with a Raspberry Pi - Part 1 of 2

In this video you'll learn how to install Neblio QT Wallet on your Raspberry Pi. This is a easy to follow step by step video tutorial. This video show you: 1. How to update your Raspberry Pi 2 ... Build a Desktop Arcade Machine with Raspberry Pi 3 and Retropie: Super Turbo Pro Edition - Duration: 27:15. Ryan Bates 1,186,190 views Here is a guide that will show you how to install the latest version of Reddcoin's Staking wallet on a Raspberry Pi with 1 or 2 gig of memory. Hey Everyone! This is a tutorial on how to setup a fully functioning bitcoin miner using a Raspberry pi. Raspberry pi's are extremely useful for programming ... 👇 Die wichtigsten Kryptoseiten in der Beschreibung 👇 Heute zeige ich euch, wie ihr jedes Wallet auf der Raspberry Pi zum Laufen bekommt. Exagear: https://elt...

#